LLVM's Clang Is Working Better For Building Windows Programs
Written by Michael Larabel in Compiler on 8 July 2014 at 07:15 AM EDT. 7 Comments
While LLVM's Clang compiler is predominantly used on Linux, OS X, and BSD systems, the Microsoft Windows support has been a focus over the past several months and is reaching an improved state for building native Windows programs with Visual C++ compatibility.

Nearly all C++ features with Clang should now work well under Windows, LLVM/Clang can self-host using the Clang-cl component, and the Chrome/Firefox browsers can now successfully compile in the Clang Windows mode. There's also compatibility with the Microsoft record layout and as of this week clang-cl is compatible with Visual Studio 2013 and Clang supports all calling conventions up through Visual Studio 2012. Run-Time Type Information (RTTI) support was also completed.

Those interested in more information on the native Windows build support for LLVM's Clang C/C++ compiler can find out more via the LLVM blog. These latest improvements can be found in LLVM 3.5 that should be released in August.

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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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