1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

SCSI Multi-Queue Performance Appears Great For Linux 3.17

Linux Kernel

Published on 18 June 2014 06:22 AM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Linux Kernel
1 Comment

Building upon the major blk-mq work for the multi-queue block layer, the SCSI multi-queue code is now in good shape according to its developers, is delivering very promising performance results, and should be merged into the Linux 3.17 kernel cycle.

SCSI-mq is too late for Linux 3.16, but it was already anticipated it would come with Linux 3.17. SCSI-mq is about plugging the SCSI kernel code to take advantage of the multi-queue block layer code. "This patch adds support for an alternate I/O path in the scsi midlayer which uses the blk-mq infrastructure instead of the legacy request code. Use of blk-mq is fully transparent to drivers." The multi-queue block layer was first introduced in Linux 3.14 and is now fairly complete with Linux 3.16. The multi-queue block layer allows balancing I/O workload across multiple CPU cores and supports multiple hardware queues along with other performance optimizations.

Christoph Hellwig mentioned a few days ago, "At this point the code is ready for merging and use by developers and early adopters. The core blk-mq code isn't that suitable for slow devices yet, mostly due to the lack of an I/O scheduler, but Jens is working on it. Similarly there is no dm-multipath support for drivers using blk-mq yet, but I'm working on it. It should also be noted that the code doesn't actually support multiple hardware queues or fine grained tuning of the blk-mq parameters yet. All these could be added fairly easily as soon as low-level drivers want to make use of them."

In terms of the performance potential of this new code to better take advantage of multiple CPU cores and designed to work with (eventually) multiple hardware queues too, "The usage of blk-mq dramatically decreases CPU usage under all workloads going down from 100% CPU usage that the old setup can hit easily to usually less than 20% for maxing out storage subsystems with 512byte reads and writes, and it allows to easily archive millions of IOPS."

Bart Van Assche responded today with his performance figures for the new multi-queue code. "A very significant performance improvement for multithreaded workloads with use_blk_mq=Y. As an example, the number of I/O operations per second reported for the random write test increased with 170%. That means 2.7 times the performance of use_blk_mq=N." A small performance improvement was also noted for the traditional SCSI mid-layer code.

The Linux 3.16 kernel is still the better parts of two months out from being released when the Linux 3.17 kernel cycle will then begin with its final release not being expected until the late September/October time-frame, but at least this SCSI-mq code with significant performance improvements for enterprise Linux SCSI users should make the wait worthwhile. There's also other likely Linux 3.17 kernel changes we have already been covering on Phoronix.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. Trying The Configurable 45 Watt TDP With AMD's A10-7800 / A6-7400K
  2. Sumo's Omni Gets Reloaded
  3. AMD A10-7800 & A6-7400K APUs Run Great On Linux
  4. Radeon Gallium3D Is Running Increasingly Well Against AMD's Catalyst Driver
Latest Linux Articles
  1. Intel Sandy Bridge Gets A Surprise Boost From Linux 3.17
  2. Open-Source Radeon Graphics Have Some Improvements On Linux 3.17
  3. CPUFreq Scaling Tests With AMD's Kaveri On Linux 3.16
  4. Enabling HyperZ Is Still An Easy Way For Faster RadeonSI Performance
Latest Linux News
  1. NVIDIA Releases CUDA 6.5 As A Huge Update
  2. GNOME 3.14 Beta Makes GLSL Optional, Supports Wayland Gesture/Touch Events
  3. KDE Software Compilation 4.14 Released
  4. The Many Things You Can Build With A Raspberry Pi
  5. AMD's Catalyst Linux Driver Preparing For A World Without An X Server?
  6. Khronos Publishes Its Slides About OpenGL-Next
  7. Proposed: A Tainted Performance State For The Linux Kernel
  8. Systemd 216 Piles On More Features, Aims For New User-Space VT
  9. LXQt 0.8 Is Being Released Soon
  10. Linux 3.17 Lands Memfd, A KDBUS Prerequisite
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Remote gui not accessible in Phoronix Test Suite 5.2
  2. The dangers of Linux kernel development
  3. Dead Island for Linux (?)
  4. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  5. AMD Offers Mantle For OpenGL-Next, Pushes Mantle To Workstations
  6. Next-Gen OpenGL To Be Announced Next Month
  7. OpenGL 4.5 Released With New Features
  8. Updated graphics drivers for Ubuntu 12.04 Precise LTS