1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Valve Publishes The Source Code For Their VOGL OpenGL Debugger

Valve

Published on 12 March 2014 09:22 PM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Valve
7 Comments

Back at the Steam Dev Days in January, Valve Software talked up their VOGL Linux OpenGL debugger for game developers and they announced it would be open-source. As of tonight, that code is now publicly available as Valve's latest open-source software project.

VOGL looks really great from what we've heard about it and are ecstatic to see the code finally available, just one week prior to the Game Developers' Conference in San Francisco, which Phoronix will be covering live with Linux gaming news and announcements.

Rich Geldreich of Valve announced the VOGL debugger code drop via his blog and the code is on GitHub.

VOGL has made a lot of progress but it still requires further development and testing. Rich noted, "Creating a OpenGL debugger that handles both full-stream tracing *and* state snapshotting (with compat profile support to boot!) is a surprisingly massive undertaking for ~3 devs, so please bear with us. We're knee deep in fleshing out the UI and improving the tracer/replayer to be fully compatible with GL v3.3 (4.x will be later this year). Please file bug reports on github and send us trace logs (or apitrace/vogl traces), etc. and we'll do our best to make it work with your app." So VOGL is currently working towards full compatibility of the OpenGL 3.3 specification but OpenGL 4.x support will not come until later this year.

VOGL was developed by Valve Software in conjunction with RAD Game Tools. So far VOGL seems to be pretty nice for game developers looking to debug their OpenGL stream -- and similar to APITrace with its capturing and replaying of GL traces. In quickly going through the code, there does appear to be some LLDB integration (LLVM's debugger similar to GDB), support for building VOGL with Clang or GCC, a voglbench is in development, a Qt-based VOGL Editor interface is being worked on, and there's a lot of other good stuff to VOGL.

Valve Publishes The Source Code For Their VOGL OpenGL Debugger


This latest Valve Software code drop comes just days after Valve open-sourced their Direct3D to OpenGL layer, among other great open-source contributions in recent months... This comes as no surprise to me; after exclusively talking with Gabe and their Linux developers two years ago when many doubted the claims of a Steam Linux client or Linux-based console being pursued by Valve, it was almost two years ago to the day that Gabe Newell sought Phoronix help in finding Linux developers for performance issues. After finding about their grand plans, it was two years ago I wrote on Phoronix (among numerous other statements that panned out), "For those that may be mad that this (closed-source) game company has poached the lead of one of the most impressive open-source game engines out there and continue to go after more all-star Linux developers, it shouldn't be too concerning. I wouldn't be referring these important open-source contributors if I thought Valve was just using it as a crude way to kill open-source software or in the secret pocket of Microsoft. I'm very confident in Valve and their Linux intentions; the impact of their work can greatly benefit the entire Linux ecosystem in huge ways. Whether you're a Linux gamer or not, it's to everyone's benefit that Valve's striking Linux work is steaming with greatness. Without the very best developers the Valve Linux cabal could be left for dead or ricocheting through a portal that has a half-life that is too short to make everything a reality."

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. A Walkthrough Of The New 32 System Open-Source Linux Benchmarking Test Farm
  2. Habey MITX-6771: Mini-ITX Board With Quad-Core J1900 Bay Trail
  3. OCZ Vector 150 SSD On Linux
  4. Noctua i4 CPU Cooler: Great For Cooling High-End LGA-2011v3 CPUs
Latest Linux Articles
  1. AMD Kaveri: Open-Source Radeon Gallium3D vs. Catalyst 14.12 Omega Driver
  2. 12-Way AMD Catalyst 14.12 vs. NVIDIA 346 Series Linux GPU Comparison
  3. AMD Catalyst 14.12 Omega Driver Brings Mixed Results For Linux Users
  4. 6-Way Winter 2014 Linux Distribution Comparison
Latest Linux News
  1. Intel Skylake Audio Support For Linux 3.19
  2. After 10+ Years, NetworkManager Reaches v1.0
  3. VDPAU Updated To v0.9
  4. An Open Hardware Random Number Generator Proposed
  5. LLVM 3.6 Will Be Branched Next Month
  6. Opera Browser Puts Out Linux Updates For The Holidays
  7. GNOME Shell 3.15.3 Adds Support For High-Contrast Themes
  8. Linux 3.19: ThinkPad Muting Redone, New Dell Backlight Support, Acer Is Banging
  9. KVM Drops Support For IA64 While Adding Various x86 Improvements
  10. GCC 4.8.4 Officially Released
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. XLennart: A Game For Systemd Haters With Nothing Better To Do
  2. Need some hand holding with upgrading xserver
  3. Debian init discussion in Phoenix Wright format
  4. The New SuperTuxKart Looks Better, But Can Cause GPU/Driver Problems
  5. FPS capped on Linux (AMD fglrx drivers)
  6. Are there an app using HSA ?
  7. Bench specific mount point
  8. Tool for measuring FPS in games