1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Qt5 To Most Likely Stick With Time-Based Released

Qt

Published on 25 February 2014 02:07 AM EST
Written by Michael Larabel in Qt
4 Comments

There's been some talk and ideas expressed recently about possibly changing the release process of the Qt tool-kit, but it appears that the process and scheduling will stay the same for the most part with abiding by time-based releases.

Some developers have been interested in seeing Qt go back to doing feature-based releases rather than being time-based. Right now the Qt5 tool-kit is released about every six months regardless of the number of features, but generally with the Qt5 releases thus far they have also been quite heavy on features. Six month release cycles is not good enough for some developers (in either direction) but Lars Knoll decided to chime in on the discussion Monday about changing the Qt release cycle and how branching is done.

Lars wrote to the Qt developers' mailing list, "In my opinion (and having seen 15 years of doing Qt releases), our time based releasing model works better than anything we have been doing before. Feature based releases is what we did in the past, and I do not want to go back. It usually meant rather long delays, and we usually never managed to get more than 1 feature release out per year."

Lars acknowledged that at times there are feature freeze exceptions for Qt, but in general the current six month release cycle is working well. He did acknowledge though some pain in creating releases with branch management of the code still being a hassle. Lars laid out some ideas going forward with having only one development branch for all new development and creating one branch for each minor release and then doing forward merges.

Those interested in more details can find his posting on the Qt development mailing list. Meanwhile the tool-kit release currently under development is Qt 5.3 and it should be released before the summer

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance
  2. CompuLab Intense-PC2: An Excellent, Fanless, Mini PC Powered By Intel's i7 Haswell
  3. From The Atom 330 To Haswell ULT: Intel Linux Performance Benchmarks
  4. AMD Radeon R9 285 Tonga Performance On Linux
Latest Linux Articles
  1. Btrfs RAID HDD Testing On Ubuntu Linux 14.10
  2. Ubuntu 14.10 Linux 32-bit vs. 64-bit Performance
  3. AMD Moves Forward With Unified Linux Driver Strategy, New Kernel Driver
  4. MSI: Update Your BIOS From The Linux Desktop
Latest Linux News
  1. Nouveau Now Supports DRI3 Without GLAMOR
  2. Features Of The Linux 3.18 Kernel
  3. Debian Now Defaults To Xfce On Non-x86 Desktops
  4. Phoenix Is Trying To Be An Open Version Of Apple's Swift
  5. Linux 3.19 To Have Skylake Graphics, PPGTT Enablement
  6. Ubuntu 16.04 Might Be The Distribution's Last 32-Bit Release
  7. Imagination Releases Full ISA Documentation For PowerVR Rogue GPUs
  8. Features GNOME Developers Want In The Linux Kernel
  9. GTK+ Gains Experimental Overlay Scrollbars
  10. Phoronix Test Suite 5.4 M3 Is Another Hearty Update
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Users/Developers Threatening Fork Of Debian GNU/Linux
  2. AMD Releases UVD Video Decode Support For R600 GPUs
  3. HOPE: The Ease Of Python With The Speed Of C++
  4. Proof that strlcpy is un-needed
  5. xbox one tv tuner
  6. Bye bye BSD, Hello Linux: A Sys Admin's Story
  7. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  8. NVIDIA Presents Its Driver Plans To Support Mir/Wayland & KMS On Linux