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C++11 Neu Framework Released

Compiler

Published on 14 May 2014 06:06 AM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Compiler
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The Neu Framework is a C++11 framework for creating artificial intelligence applications, compiler construction, and similar tasks.

Here's how the LLVM-based Neu Framework is described by its authors:
Neu (pronounced "new") is a C++ 11 framework, collection of programming languages, and multipurpose software system designed for: the creation of artificial intelligence applications and systems, modeling and simulation, programming language and compiler construction, technical computing in general, and more. Neu's primary design motivations are: elegance and simplicity achieved through good design, and developer convenience/productivity while at the same time aiming for the highest performance possible. Neu is made available as open source under a minimally-restrictive BSD-style license and can be used freely in commercial applications. Neu was designed for UNIX-based systems and compiles and runs on Mac OS X and Linux and is expected to be easily ported to other systems as well. The Neu codebase consists of highly reusable and well-integrated components, providing a clean and well-refined design and implementation which is easy to read, use, and modify/extend.

Neu features a large range of functionality including: powerful datatypes, most importantly nvar, a recursive variant type capable of representing virtually any type of data, including nested and symbolic data, in a highly efficient manner; easy program setup including configuration and options handling; powerful language design features which were used to create NML - an interpreted language with functional programming aspects, NPL - a high-performance concurrent language using LLVM JIT compilation; a task and graph-based concurrency system; networking and distributed objects; Meta Concepts: A Knowledge-Based Code Generation System; high performance neural networks using LLVM/JIT; several utility classes, and more.

It sounds interesting and it's also yet another interesting use-case of LLVM and Clang. Those wishing to find out more about the BSD-licensed Neu Framework can visit its project site Andrometa.net.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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