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LLVM Is At Nearly 2.5 Million Lines Of Code

Compiler

Published on 26 December 2013 01:18 PM EST
Written by Michael Larabel in Compiler
8 Comments

The LLVM compiler infrastructure made immense progress in 2013 and saw lots of adoption in new areas, improvements to many of the back-ends, and various other new features. Here's a look at LLVM's accomplishments in 2013.

While we're still waiting on the belated release of LLVM 3.4 that was supposed to happen earlier in the week, the features of that release are outlined in this article. The other major release of 2013 was LLVM 3.3 and its work is covered in the best features of LLVM 3.3.

In terms of the development over 2013 for LLVM, I ran GitStats on the LLVM code-base itself -- not Clang or any other sub-projects but just the upstream core LLVM itself. LLVM as of this morning is up to 2,347,930 lines of code that came across 98,829 commits from 370 different authors.

LLVM Is At Nearly 2.5 Million Lines Of Code

LLVM saw more commits this year than it received in 2011 or 2012. To date this year there's been 10,751 commits that added 1,148,493 lines of code and did away with 528,346 lines of code. LLVM had a net gain of over 620,000 lines of code this calendar year!

LLVM Is At Nearly 2.5 Million Lines Of Code

Chris Lattner continues to command LLVM's development.

LLVM Is At Nearly 2.5 Million Lines Of Code

Rafael Espindola (Sony), Chandler Carruth (Google), Daniel Sanders (Imagination Technologies), Daniel Dunbar (Google), Hal Finkel (Argonne National Laboratory), and Bill Wendling (Apple) were among the top contributors this year to LLVM.

LLVM Is At Nearly 2.5 Million Lines Of Code

Of the ~230 contributors to LLVM this year, the author of the most commits was Rafael Espindola at Sony. Sony's PlayStation 4 uses the LLVM/Clang compiler.

LLVM Is At Nearly 2.5 Million Lines Of Code

LLVM's file count certainly went a lot higher this year.

LLVM Is At Nearly 2.5 Million Lines Of Code

LLVM's code-base is growing fast and soon should surpass 2.5 million lines of code -- plus there's still much code as well within Clang, Compiler-RT, and other LLVM sub-projects. What else will LLVM have in store for 2014? Hopefully the long-awaited mainlining of OpenMP support and other great features.

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