1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

GNOME & Intel Developers Plan The Wayland Future

GNOME

Published on 30 July 2013 01:47 PM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in GNOME
209 Comments

The GNOME annual developer conference, GUADEC, is beginning this week in the Czech Republic. At this GNOME-focused open-source event, the developers will be joined by Intel Wayland developers as they plot their eventual departure from the X.Org Server.

Similar to the KDE camp, the GNOME developers are committed to supporting Wayland as the next-generation Linux display server. There's already Wayland improvements in GNOME 3.10 and they intend to move at full-speed with Wayland.

The goal is with GNOME 3.10 in September to have X11 still be the default but where the GNOME Shell can function as a Wayland compositor and the GNOME stack begins to work for those wishing to run experiments and early testing on Wayland. By GNOME 3.12 in March of 2014, they hope that the complete port of GNOME to Wayland will be ready. Existing older applications will continue to be supported via XWayland. GNOME 3.12 would have a requirement that all core GNOME applications work with Wayland.

Red Hat's Christian Schaller has already blogged about GUADEC and Wayland with their plans for the week ahead. Christian writes, "One of the items I am looking the most forward to during this GUADEC to is to be able to talk our friends at Intel and figure out how we can effectively work together on Wayland. We have put together a team to accelerate Wayland development inside Red Hat, with the goal of getting it ready for deployment in Fedora. There are of course a lot of things that needs to happen in preparation for this, like getting the GNOME Shell ready to work as a Wayland compositor. We will be looking at a long range of items, but among the more important ones is dealing with input devices in Wayland, like handling multiple mice, touch or Wacom tablets and making sure XWayland works so well that our users will not need to realize they are using Wayland instead of X once we transition over."

The port of the GNOME desktop to Wayland within Red Hat's focus for Fedora is presently in planning for Fedora 21, the distribution's first release of 2014. Some early GNOME Wayland support could end up being found in Fedora 20 though. The Fedora Wayland planning is on this Wiki page.

Intel's Rob Bradford, who is one of the developers that has been working on Wayland, is also ready for GUADEC's Wayland focus. "This GUADEC there will be a couple of sessions on Friday afternoon from 2pm about Wayland. I’ll be giving a presentation with a brief introduction to what Wayland is, what new features we’ve worked on in the last cycle as well as what’s planned for the next one. As this is GUADEC i’ll of course be covering how we’re doing with getting Wayland integrated into GNOME. There will also be a Wayland panel discussion where you can ask your tricky questions of myself, Owen Taylor, Robert Bragg and Kristian Høgsberg – to get things started i’ve got some already prepared!"

Stay tuned for coverage on Phoronix after the GUADEC GNOME Wayland plans are devised.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. CompuLab Intense-PC2: An Excellent, Fanless, Mini PC Powered By Intel's i7 Haswell
  2. From The Atom 330 To Haswell ULT: Intel Linux Performance Benchmarks
  3. AMD Radeon R9 285 Tonga Performance On Linux
  4. Apotop Wi-Copy
Latest Linux Articles
  1. AMD Moves Forward With Unified Linux Driver Strategy, New Kernel Driver
  2. MSI: Update Your BIOS From The Linux Desktop
  3. NVIDIA vs. AMD 2D Linux Drivers: Catalyst Is Getting Quite Good At 2D
  4. 15-Way GPU Comparison With Mesa 10.3 + Linux 3.17
Latest Linux News
  1. Phoronix Test Suite 5.4 M3 Is Another Hearty Update
  2. GParted 0.20 Improves Btrfs Support
  3. EXT4 In Linux 3.18 Has Clean-ups, Bug Fixes
  4. Emacs 24.4 Has Built-In Web Browser, Improved Multi-Monitor Support
  5. NVIDIA's NVPTX Support For GCC Is Close To Being Merged
  6. KDE's KWin On Wayland Begins Using Libinput
  7. Khronos Releases OpenVX 1.0 Specification
  8. Linux Kernel Working Towards GNU11/C11 Compatibility
  9. Ubuntu 15.04 Is Codenamed After A Monkey: Vivid Vervet
  10. Following GCC, Clang Looks To Default To C11
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. HOPE: The Ease Of Python With The Speed Of C++
  2. Users/Developers Threatening Fork Of Debian GNU/Linux
  3. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  4. Bye bye BSD, Hello Linux: A Sys Admin's Story
  5. NVIDIA Presents Its Driver Plans To Support Mir/Wayland & KMS On Linux
  6. AMD Is Restructuring Again, Losing 7% Of Employees
  7. Open-Source AMD Fusion E-350 Support Takes A Dive
  8. Upgrade to Kaveri, very slow VDPAU performance