Harlan: A Scheme-Based GPU Programming Language
Written by Michael Larabel in Free Software on 04 July 2013 at 05:33 PM EDT. 3 Comments
Free Software
Harlan is a new research programming language focused around taking advantage of modern GPUs. The Harlan language syntax is derived from Scheme while the language itself currently compiles to OpenCL.

Harlan is largely the work out of a researcher at Indiana University for tapping the potential offered by modern graphics processors. Harlan tries to make it easier and more productive to tap GPUs while not having as much of a learning hurdle for the developer as explicitly writing code for OpenCL or CUDA. Harlan itself compiles to OpenCL so that it can then be used by Intel's OpenCL SDK, NVIDIA's CUDA Toolkit, or AMD's APP SDK.

More details on the Harlan GPU computing initiative can be found via its GitHub project page.
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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