LLVM Developers Bring Up Using C++11, Again
Written by Michael Larabel in Compiler on 29 October 2013 at 06:52 AM EDT. 8 Comments
LLVM developers are once again bringing up the topic of whether their compiler infrastructure and Clang C/C++ front-end can utilize C++11 code.

LLVM/Clang is already C+11 feature complete (and support lots of the yet-to-be-finalized C++14), but this proposal is about using C++11 features within the compiler code-base itself. The hesitation in adopting C++11 usage is that it would limit older compiler tool-chains in building LLVM if they don't have full C+11 support.

Modern GCC has C++11 support too, but the main concern is Microsoft's Visual C++ compiler support in not having full C++11 compliance. The matter of using C++11 features within LLVM and Clang itself has been brought up several times before to mixed reactions and ultimately they haven't taken full advantage of C++11 yet. Some LLVM sub-projects, however, are using C++11 functionality within their code-bases.

The most recent LLVM C++11 discussion is happening within this LLVMdev mailing list thread. The discussion is ongoing but it looks like we may finally see LLVM developers taking some advantage of C++11 within their code.

If all goes through, LLVM would become aggressive in the compilers they support for building; under one proposal it would mean GCC 4.7, Clang 3.1, and Visual Studio 2012 as supported build compilers. Chris Lattner the founder of the LLVM project agrees that C++11 and other modern C++ features need to be taken advantage of, but the issue comes down to "how and when" for taking advantage of the language features.

Among the C++11 features the developers are seeking to use include r-value references, auto, range-based for-loops, lamdas, static_assert, nullptr, and new STD library features.

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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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