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Differences Between X.Org, Wayland & Mir

Wayland

Published on 19 March 2013 08:26 PM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Wayland
51 Comments

Canonical's Christopher Halse Rogers has blogged some more about their views on the Mir Display Server and its design relative to X11/X.Org and Wayland.

Rogers has already written a lot about Mir in Canonical's attempt to promote the Wayland alternative and their views for designing it rather than using Wayland or forking it.

His latest blog post on the matter is Wayland, Mir, and X - different projects. Key points include:

- Google Protobuf is used as the IPC (Inter-Process Communication) method for Mir. ProtoBuf is short for Protocol Buffers and is Google's data interchange format.

- "Where the Wayland libraries are all about IPC, Mir is about producing a library to do the drudge work of a display-server-compositor-thing, so in this way it's more like Xorg than Wayland. In fact, it's a bit more specific - Mir is about creating a library to make the most awesome Unity display-server-compositor-thingy. We're not aiming to satisfy anyone's requirements but our own. That said, our requirements aren't likely to be hugely specific, so Mir will likely be generally useful."

- "Perhaps we'll become so awesome that it'll make sense for GNOME or KDE to rebase their compositors on Mir, but that's a long way away."

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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