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Areas Where LLVM's Clang Still Needs Help

Compiler

Published on 30 April 2013 02:52 AM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Compiler
1 Comment

While LLVM's Clang C/C++ compiler already has feature complete C++11 support and the developers have already been working on C++14 features, there are some open projects where the GCC alternative is in need of some assistance.

As pointed out within the latest SVN trunk for the Clang compiler code-base in their documentation (or within the Git mirror), there's several open work items that could use some development help. Here's some of the highlights for the most pressing Clang projects seeking some love:

- Improvements to the undefined behavior checking exposed through the -fsanitize= compiler switch. Some issues are already noted, but they want a lot more undefined behavior coverage.

- A tool to generate code documentation with an auto-documentation system like Doxygen. On a related note, see CLDOC: A Clang-Based C/C++ Document Generator and Clang Can Analyze Code Comments, Generate Docs.

- There's a lot of target support that is heavily stubbed out and far from being complete and could be loved, by simply scanning the source-code tree and working on various items.

- Using Clang libraries to implement better versions of "existing tools." Among the items noted are potential Clang-based implementations of distcc, delta testcase reduction, and indent source reformatting.

- Self-testing of Clang.

- Continued work on C++1y/C++14 support.

- Improved support for cross-compilation of applications. LLVM/Clang is already designed to be a cross-compiler but further improvements can be made within the "universal driver" world.

- A configuration manager to better take advantage all of the architectures, operating systems, and other configurations for which software can be built for using this C/C++ compiler.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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