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KLyDE: A New Lightweight KDE Project Started

KDE

Published on 12 April 2013 11:03 AM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in KDE
13 Comments

A SUSE Linux developer has started a new project called KLyDE. The focus of KLyDE (K Lightweight Desktop Environment) is to provide a lightweight KDE desktop.

Will Stephenson, the SUSE developer who has been involved with KDE for years, has been brewing this idea for a while and is beginning to take action on this lightweight KDE implementation. "KDE is not intrinsically bloated. At its core, it jumps through a lot of hoops for memory efficiency and speed, and is modular to a fault. But most packagings of KDE take a kitchen sink approach, and when you install your KDE distribution you get a full suite of desktop, applets and applications. The other major criticism of KDE is that it is too configurable. The KlyDE project applies KDE's modularity and configurability to the challenge of making a lightweight desktop. However, what I don't want to do is a hatchet job where functionality is crudely chopped out of the desktop to fit some conception of light weight."

What the Lightweight KDE Desktop project is seeking is to provide a minimal footprint through packaging changes by factoring out optional components of the KDE desktop, configuration / profile changes, and to ship a simple configuration. This lightweight KDE will also focus upon a fast start-up timeby refactoring startkde or looking at other alternative KDE start-up systems.

There's some KlyDE packages being offered right now on the Open Build Service for SUSE 12.3 and there's other progress advancing elsewhere. More details on this lightweight KDE desktop can be found in this blog post.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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