Shumway: Mozilla Does An Open-Source SWF Runtime
Written by Michael Larabel in Mozilla on 14 November 2012 at 04:58 PM EST. 22 Comments
Mozilla announced Shumway this week, a new research project that seeks to create an open SWF (Adobe Flash) run-time environment to make Flash more open and for exposing SWF capabilities to platforms where the Adobe file-format wasn't backed by an official Flash Player.

Shumway is still very experimental and not working for all SWF content, but it's moving along and evolving rapidly. Shumway should be especially interesting for mobile devices where Flash Player support tends to be lacking. The Shumway implementation comes down to five components: Core, AVM1, AVM2, Browser Integration, and Testing/Demos.

The Shumway Core is made up of the file-format parser, rasterizer, and event system. AVM1 is a JavaScript interpreter for ActionScript versions one and two Bytecode, and AVM2 is a JavaScript interpreter and Just-In-Time (JIT) compiler for ActionScript 3 Bytecode.

Details on Mozilla Shumway were announced in this Mozilla Research blog post. The code is currently being hosted on GitHub where it's described as, "Shumway is an HTML5 technology experiment that explores building a faithful and efficient renderer for the SWF file format without native code assistance. Shumway is community-driven and supported by Mozilla. Our goal is to create a general-purpose, web standards-based platform for parsing and rendering SWFs. Integration with Firefox is a possibility if the experiment proves successful."

This non-native implementation is what differentiates Shumway from the other open-source SWF / Flash Player projects like Gnash and Lightspark.

Shumway can be built as a JavaScript extension to Mozilla Firefox on versions 18 and later of the popular open-source web-browser. Shumway might be ultimately integrated into Firefox if the project moves along enough and reaches a stable point.
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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