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Using USB Redirection With QEMU/KVM

Virtualization

Published on 02 July 2012 07:29 AM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Virtualization
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For those not up to speed on the latest features for Linux virtualization when using QEMU/KVM, there is support since for USB device redirection over the network for virtual machines.

Using USB redirection with Linux KVM virtualization has been possible since last year, but only today a full-length guide on using this feature has been posted to Linux-KVM.com.

There are two USB redirection modes support: using Red Hat's SPICE protocol or via a TCP server. The TCP solution doesn't depend upon SPICEwhile also supporting other remoting protocols like VNC. For using SPICE there is a GUI-based tool for configuring the USB device redirection while the TCP solution has support built into the virt-manager program.

The Linux-KVM.com guide provides information on how to utilize this USB re-direction with QEMU/KVM.
USB redirection is a nice feature of KVM with many possible use cases. Two that immediately come to mind include backing data from your virtual machine locally or attaching usb devices that provide additional functionality to your guest virtual machine. All this without having physical access to your KVM virtual server.

The big downside to the method explained in this post is having to use multiple management tools to use this feature. In this case it required using virt-manager to configure and start/stop your virtual machine and a separate tool called spicy to perform the usb redirection to your guest.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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