1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

openSUSE Has A Problem, Is Seeking New Direction

SUSE

Published on 14 June 2012 06:44 AM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in SUSE
76 Comments

Stephan Kulow, the release manager for openSUSE, has publicly acknowledged this morning that this community distribution to SUSE has found itself in a problem and they're now looking to the community to seek out a fundamentally new direction for this Linux distribution.

A message hit the opensuse-factory mailing list this morning, written by Kulow, and entitled "Calling for a new openSUSE development model." I was alerted in advance to the pending announcement yesterday in an embargoed email entitled "openSUSE to do some soul searching after delay of release."

What it's come down to is that the openSUSE 12.2 development releases have seen major delays due to broken packages and other problems. Every milestone has been delayed and now today they're delaying the first release candidate as well as the final release. Because of these delays and limited manpower, they're seeking out something different to do. Yesterday's private email also expressed, "[Kulow] believe believes the cause of the delays is a result of changes in the openSUSE community lately. We've grown and our current way of working doesn't scale anymore."

In yesterday's advance email, "This is a combination of a wakup-call and an opportunity to find new directions. We need to start working differently - and as we've got tools like OBS and initiatives like Tumbleweed, we are uniquely equipped among the major Linux distributions to do something new and different. Let's see where the discussions bring us."

Among the expressed ideas they started off with were abandoning release schedules for openSUSE, pulling back to releasing on an annual basis, and/or moving to a pure rolling-release model built around openSUSE Tumbleweed. Below are some of the ideas Stephan expressed in his public email this morning.
1. We need to have more people that do the integration work - this partly means fixing build failures and partly debugging and fixing bugs that have unknown origin. Those will get maintainer power of all of factory devel projects, so they can actually work on packages that current maintainers are unable to.
2. We should work way more in pure staging projects and less in develop projects. Having apache in Apache and apache modules in Apache:Modules and ruby and rubygems in different projects may have appeared like a clever plan when set up, but it's a nightmare when it comes to factory development - an apache or ruby update are a pure game of luck. The same of course applies to all libraries - they never can have all their dependencies in one project. But this needs some kind of tooling support - but I'm willing to invest there, so we can more easily pick "green stacks". My goal (a pretty radical change to now) is a no-tolerance strategy about packages breaking other packages.
3. As working more strictly will require more time, I would like to either ditch release schedules all together or release only once a year and then rebase Tumbleweed - as already discussed in the RC1 thread.
A posting to be published in the next few hours on news.opensuse.org will lay out additional details and request for comments from the community about what future direction openSUSE should take.

What do you think openSUSE should do?

Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. Mini-Box M350: A Simple, Affordable Mini-ITX Case
  2. Overclocking The AMD AM1 Athlon & Sempron APUs
  3. AMD Athlon 5350 / 5150 & Sempron 3850 / 2650
  4. Upgraded Kernel & Mesa Yield A Big Boost For Athlon R3 Graphics
Latest Linux Articles
  1. A Quick Look At GCC 4.9 vs. LLVM Clang 3.5
  2. Are AMD Athlon/Sempron APUs Fast Enough For Steam On Linux?
  3. AMD Athlon's R3 Graphics: RadeonSI Gallium3D vs. Catalyst
  4. GCC 4.9 Compiler Optimization Benchmarks For Faster Binaries
Latest Linux News
  1. R600 Gallium3D Disables LLVM Back-End By Default
  2. Fedora 21 Gets GNOME 3.12, PHP 5.6, Mono 3.4
  3. Fedora Workstation Is Making Me Quite Excited
  4. Maynard: A Lightweight Wayland Desktop
  5. Chromium Browser Going Through Growing Pains In Ubuntu 14.04
  6. KDE 4.13 Is Being Released Today With New Features
  7. Trying Out Radeon R9 290 Graphics On Open-Source
  8. Intel Broadwell GT3 Graphics Have Dual BSD Rings
  9. Early Linux 3.15 Benchmarks Of Intel Core i7 + Radeon
  10. Red Hat Releases Its RHEL 7 Release Candidate
  11. New Features Coming To Xubuntu 14.04 LTS
  12. NVIDIA Officially Releases CUDA 6
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. The GNOME Foundation Is Running Short On Money
  2. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  3. Linux Kernel Developers Fed Up With Ridiculous Bugs In Systemd
  4. Change installation destination from home directory
  5. After Jack Keane, RuseSoft will briing Ankh 3 to Linux through Desura
  6. Bye bye BSD, Hello Linux: A Sys Admin's Story
  7. New tool for undervolt/overclock AMD K8L and K10 processors
  8. How to enable opengl 3.3 on r9 270?