1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking Benchmarking Platform
Phoromatic Test Orchestration

DMA-BUF PRIME Coming Together For Linux 3.5

Linux Kernel

Published on 12 May 2012 11:34 AM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Linux Kernel
18 Comments

The DMA-BUF PRIME support in the popular open-source Linux graphics drivers is coming together for the Linux 3.5 kernel to allow for GPU offloaded rendering.

Coming out this week was a new patch for the DMA-BUF/PRIME buffer sharing support so that Intel's DRM driver can offload rendering in one direction and outputs in the other. This patch is based upon David Airlie's work and amounts to just under 200 lines of code in the i915 kernel DRM driver.

Out on the same day from Alex Deucher was a patch entitled "add PRIME support" that effectively does the same as the Intel driver, but instead for the Radeon DRM driver. This too was just about 200 lines of code.

These patches come one week after David Airlie added PRIME sharing support to the TTM memory manager (here) as well as PRIME support for the Nouveau DRM driver (here).

This PRIME support builds upon the DMA-BUF buffer sharing mechanism that was originally merged into Linux 3.3 and the PRIME fundamentals in Linux 3.4. With the Linux 3.5 kernel is where the popular Direct Rendering Manager hardware drivers should support this for sharing buffers between drivers / GPUs. While Intel / Radeon / Nouveau are the most popular drivers, there's also been ongoing DMA-BUF work for the Texas Instruments OMAP, Samsung Exynos, and DisplayLink UDL KMS drivers too.

This technology can ultimately be used for things like NVIDIA Optimus or SLI/CrossFire. DMA-BUF itself largely was born within the Linaro camp for buffer sharing between driver drivers for ARM SoCs. Last November was when PRIME got back under-way for the GPU offloaded rendering.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Trying Out The Modern Linux Desktops With 4 Monitors + AMD/NVIDIA Graphics
  2. Turning A Basement Into A Big Linux Server Room
  3. NVIDIA's $1000+ GeForce GTX TITAN X Delivers Maximum Linux Performance
  4. OS X 10.10 vs. Ubuntu 15.04 vs. Fedora 21 Tests: Linux Sweeps The Board
  5. The New Place Where Linux Code Is Constantly Being Benchmarked
  6. 18-GPU NVIDIA/AMD Linux Comparison Of BioShock: Infinite
Latest Linux News
  1. Fedora 22 Alpha Now Available For AArch64 & PowerPC64
  2. Systemd Developers Did NOT Fork The Linux Kernel
  3. PulseAudio 7.0 To Enable LFE Remixing By Default
  4. Features & Changes Coming For Mir 0.13
  5. How Far Valve Has Come: Three Years Ago They Needed OpenGL Linux Help
  6. Audacity 2.1 Improves Noise Reduction, Adds Real-Time Effects Preview
  7. Linux 4.0-rc6 Kernel Released
  8. Automatically Managing The Linux Benchmarks Firing Constantly
  9. The Big Features Of The Linux 4.0 Kernel
  10. Mesa's Android Support Is Currently In Bad Shape
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. Introducing The Library Operating System For Linux
  2. Improved OpenCL Support For Blender's Cycles Renderer
  3. Allwinner Continues Jerking Around The Open-Source Community
  4. Open-Source Driver Fans Will Love NVIDIA's New OpenGL Demo
  5. GNOME 3.16 Released: It's Their Best Release Yet
  6. Systemd Change Allows For Stateless Systems With Tmpfs
  7. Ubuntu 15.04 Final Beta Released
  8. Nuclide: Facebook's New Unified IDE