1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking Benchmarking Platform
Phoromatic Test Orchestration

AMD Radeon HD 7970 On Linux

AMD

Published on 22 December 2011 09:20 AM EST
Written by Michael Larabel in AMD
53 Comments

You've may have heard or seen that AMD introduced the Radeon HD 7970 graphics card this morning as their first product built in their "Southern Islands" family and is based on their new GPU architecture, but how well does it work under Linux for the open-source and closed-source AMD Catalyst Linux drivers?

First of all, the AMD Radeon HD 7970 graphics card is a 28nm beast that boasts 2048 Stream processors, 128 texture units, 925MHz core clock, 3GB of 5.5GHz effective GDDR5 memory on a 384-bit bus, and is their first product of GCN (Graphics Core Next), their new graphics architecture. The launch cost on her is $549 USD. GCN represents the largest architectural change for AMD since they launched the R600 GPU several years ago.

So how does the Radeon HD 7970 "Tahiti" work under Linux? Well, you can have OpenGL and compute support right now under Linux with the HD 7970 should you be using the latest AMD Catalyst Linux driver. The support is in place just like the Windows driver and is available at-launch as AMD has been doing for Linux since the Radeon HD 4800 "RV770" series a few years ago.

The open-source driver support is not yet available. No patches have magically landed this morning and they haven't released any support work in advance of the hardware's availability. The open-source Radeon HD 7000 series support will require significant driver changes to the Radeon DRM kernel component as well as a brand new Gallium3D driver, which is being based upon a stripped-down version of R600g.

Even when all of the initial support pieces are in place, you will still be in an OpenGL ~2.1 world with limited performance, so if you have just spent over $500 USD on a high-performance Radeon HD 7970 chances are you will not want to use the open-source Linux driver anytime soon. You'll also be without OpenCL/Compute support initially, unless using the AMD binary blob driver.

For full details about the Radeon HD 7000 series Linux driver support, read: Radeon HD 7000 Series Linux Driver Support, AMD Driver Support State For Radeon HD 7000 Series, and Radeon HD 7000 Series Will Bring New 3D Driver.

As far as how well the Radeon HD 7970 is working under Linux with the Catalyst driver, that is a good question. AMD decided not to send out any HD 7970 sample to Phoronix in advance, so as such, there is no Linux information available to the public this morning with benchmark results or other information. I don't know if they will decide to send one in the next few days or not, but hopefully, so then I don't have to spend $549 USD on the graphics card or just let Linux enthusiasts go in the dark about HD 7970 information. It's a same though especially when they're users of the Phoronix Test Suite, etc. [At least though they're sending out a new APU and that will be here tomorrow so I can be occupied with some new AMD APU Linux tests on Christmas.]

If you would like to see any Windows reviews of the new AMD Radeon HD 7970 3GB PCI Express graphics card, there are a number of Radeon HD 7970 reviews that were found automatically this morning by the OpenBenchmarking.org engine. Stay tuned (and follow me on Twitter) for more information as soon as I manage to get my hands on an AMD Radeon HD 7970, GCN and the graphics card itself look quite nice.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Linux News
  1. HiSense Chromebook Benchmarks When Running Ubuntu Linux
  2. Mandriva Linux Was Allegedly Brought Down By Employee Lawsuits
  3. GNOME 3.17.2 Is Released As The Latest Look Towards GNOME 3.18
  4. Phoronix Turns 11 Years Old Next Week: How Should We Celebrate?
  5. Ubuntu Community Council Reaffirms Its Decision Against Kubuntu's Leader
  6. Future Plans For Changing Fedora's Installer
  7. Confusion Mounts Over Wayland's Actual License
  8. GNOME's Mutter Now Supports Drag-n-Drop To/From Wayland & X11
  9. Wine 1.7.44 Works On More 64-bit ARM Support
  10. Phoronix Test Suite 5.8 Milestone 5 Brings Near Final "Belev" Experience
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Btrfs RAID 0/1/5/6/10 Five-Disk Benchmarks On Linux 4.1
  2. Opening The Gates To Our Daily Open-Source Linux Benchmark Results
  3. The Latest Features For Linux Performance Management + Benchmark Monitoring
  4. Noctua NH-U12DX i4 + NF-F12
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. NVIDIA's Proprietary Driver Is Moving Closer With Kernel Mode-Setting
  2. Features Added To Mesa 10.6 For Open-Source GPU Drivers
  3. Ubuntu's LXD vs. KVM For The Linux Cloud
  4. Friction Building Around An Ubuntu Community Council Decision
  5. The Latest Linux Kernel Git Code Fixes The EXT4 RAID0 Corruption Problem
  6. The CompuLab Fitlet Is A Neat Little Linux PC With AMD SoC
  7. Linux 4.1-rc5 Kernel Released
  8. Russia's Baikal Chips End Up Going For A MIPS CPU