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Enesim: A Flexible, Extensible Graphics Framework

Free Software

Published on 12 March 2012 10:27 PM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Free Software
6 Comments

Earlier this month I wrote about the Fog Framework, a high-performance graphics library alternative to the well-known Cairo. The principal developer of another open-source library, Enesim, has since written in about this project that works with the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries and focuses upon flexibility and extensibility.

Enesim is said to be similar to the Fog Framework and started out as a research project to optimize the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries, but then ended up becoming a project in its own right. The Enesim graphics framework supports vector and raster-based graphics, is considered highly-extensible, supports OpenCL and OpenGL renderers along with a software-based fall-back, and multi-threading support. The SVG renderer for Enesim is also said to be significantly faster than other common SVG libraries.

Also being worked on in conjunction with the core Enesim library are several other components: Eon (an Enesim-based tool-kit), Ender (an object-oriented description system), Emage (a sync/a-sync image loading system), Etex (the text renderer), Escen (an animation system), and Egueb (providing the DOM, SVG, and CSS parser/renderer).

Those wishing to learn more about the Enesim graphics framework can find it on Google code. The getting started page offers a more extensive overview of the LGPL-licensed project.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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