Fedora 27 Aiming To Drop Out Alpha Releases
Written by Michael Larabel in Fedora on 20 February 2017 at 07:43 PM EST. 13 Comments
FEDORA --
In a similar effort to Ubuntu itself not issuing alpha/beta releases the past few years as they focused on the quality of their daily ISOs instead, Fedora developers have been discussing a similar maneuver of beginning to drop alpha releases from their schedule.

Beginning with Fedora 27 we could see no more alpha releases, if the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee approves of this change. The focus would be on ensuring Fedora Rawhide is always in good shape and save on release engineering time and other resources with putting out alpha builds.

This could also be of help in potentially getting a Fedora release out on time, a feat not accomplished in a number of cycles now.

For those interested the NoMoreAlpha Wiki page documents the planned change for Fedora 27. "By gating Rawhide builds from landing in the compose and gating the publication of composes on automated test results we will ensure Rawhide will always be at Alpha quality. This will make it more generally useful to people as a daily driver and development platform, and mean we no longer need to go through the process of building, testing and shipping Alpha releases. The initial testing will be ensuring that a package is installable and that it does not break existing packages installation. Over time we can enable extra testing to gate the build going into rawhide. Builds will land in the buildroot to be built against before they make it to the compose."
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Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

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