Graphics Cards Archives
Overclocking The NVIDIA Quadro FX1700

Back in March we had reviewed the Quadro FX1700 512MB graphics card, which is NVIDIA's lower-end OpenGL 2.1 workstation graphics card that's based upon the consumer G84 core. In the benchmarks that had followed, we had compared the Quadro FX1700 performance under Windows, Linux, and Solaris. We had found the performance of this Quadro graphics card performed well under all three platforms, but Ubuntu Linux had led the race. We are now preparing a review of the high-end ATI FireGL V8600 1GB graphics card for publishing in the coming days, but we have stumbled upon some results from the FX1700 that never ended up making it out earlier. Specifically we had overclocked the Quadro FX1700 with CoolBits and it had actually worked out quite well. In this article are the overclocking results from this NVIDIA workstation graphics card as well as comparing the performance to an ATI Radeon HD 2900XT 512MB graphics card.

12 May 2008 - Add A Comment
NVIDIA Quadro NVS 140M

Earlier this month we took a look at the NVIDIA Quadro FX1700, which is one of NVIDIA's mid-range workstation graphics cards that boasts 512MB of video memory, support for CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture), OpenGL 2.1, and the power consumption for this PCI Express graphics card is less than 50 Watts. In the tests that followed, the FX1700 had performed quite well at the workstation-oriented SPECViewPerf benchmark and we had compared its Ubuntu Linux performance to Solaris Express and Microsoft Windows Vista. The NVIDIA Linux driver with the FX1700 had the best performance and it ended up being a nice graphics card for around $500 USD. Today we are looking at the NVIDIA Linux workstation performance once again but this time it's on the mobile front with the Quadro NVS 140M, which can be found in a number of business notebooks including the Lenovo ThinkPad T61.

28 March 2008 - 3 Comments
AMD Radeon HD 3200 / 780G

Last year AMD introduced the flagship 790 Chipset series as part of their Spider Platform for use with the Phenom processors and Radeon HD 3800 graphics. Until earlier this month when AMD introduced the 780 Series, missing was any chipset with integrated graphics capabilities supporting these first AMD quad-core processors. Now we have AMD's 780G and 780V Chipsets, which are designed to be the mainstream solutions to the 790FX, but they pack the best integrated graphics processor (IGP) ever created by the combined ATI/AMD engineering talent. Since its launch at the CeBIT trade show, the AMD 780G has received rave reviews for its vehement performance due to its graphics core that's derived from the AMD RV610. The benchmarks available on launch day were only for Microsoft Windows operating systems, but this morning we have the Radeon HD 3200 Linux results from the AMD 780G. Is this IGP a crown jewel on Linux?

24 March 2008 - 26 Comments
ASUS GeForce 9600GT 512MB

In late February NVIDIA had introduced the GeForce 9 series with the introduction of the mid-range GeForce 9600GT 512MB graphics card. Earlier this week they then introduced the GeForce 9800 GX2 graphics card, which consists of two NVIDIA GPUs bridged together with SLI support. We have been quiet on how the GeForce 9 series performs under Linux, but this morning we are providing our initial GeForce 9600GT results using an ASUS EN9600GT TOP HDMI and comparing its Linux desktop performance to its GeForce 8 sibling and the ATI Radeon HD 3850 and 3870. On Windows the GeForce 9600GT has been able to outperform the Radeon HD 3850/3870, but on Linux an entirely different story is rendered.

21 March 2008 - 13 Comments
NVIDIA Performance: Windows vs. Linux vs. Solaris

Earlier this week we previewed the Quadro FX1700, which is one of NVIDIA's mid-range workstation graphics cards that is based upon the G84GL core that in turn is derived from the consumer-class GeForce 8600 series. This PCI Express graphics card offers 512MB of video memory with two dual-link DVI connections and support for OpenGL 2.1 while maintaining a maximum power consumption of just 42 Watts. As we mentioned in the preview article, we would be looking at this graphics card's performance not only under Linux but also testing this workstation solution in both Microsoft Windows and Sun's Solaris. In this article today, we are doing just that as we test the NVIDIA Quadro FX1700 512MB with each of these operating systems and their respective binary display drivers.

7 March 2008 - 13 Comments
NVIDIA Quadro FX1700 512MB

Workstation GPUs are not our main focus at Phoronix, but with the increasing use of Linux on workstation systems, we will be starting to look at professional graphics products this month and likely more of them in the future. We are beginning this expedition by looking at the Quadro FX1700, which is one of NVIDIA's mid-range workstation graphics cards. This Quadro graphics card boasts 512MB of video memory, support for CUDA, and OpenGL 2.1 support. According to NVIDIA's product literature, the Quadro FX1700 is engineered to deliver exceptional performance, quality, and price for professionals.

4 March 2008 - 2 Comments
ATI Radeon HD 3650 512MB

Last week AMD introduced the ATI Radeon HD 3400 and 3600 series, which are the new low-end graphics processors compared to the Radeon HD 3800 series. These budget graphics cards are branded as the Radeon HD 3450, 3470, and 3650 and are all available for under $100 USD. While they may be cheap, they are the first graphics cards to introduce support for DisplayPort. DisplayPort is the newest digital display interface standard, backed by VESA, and is direct competition to HDMI. DisplayPort has yet to be fully supported by the available Linux display drivers, but the Catalyst Linux driver already supports these new ATI graphics cards and there will be open-source support through the RadeonHD driver in the coming days. At hand today we have the Sapphire Radeon HD 3650 512MB graphics card as we deliver the first Linux benchmarks for this RV635 GPU.

1 February 2008 - 14 Comments
ATI Radeon HD 3400, 3600 Series

AMD has today announced the ATI Radeon HD 3400 and 3600 series graphics processors, which are the budget-minded siblings to the Radeon HD 3850 and 3870. The graphics cards currently now shipping in these series are the HD 3450, HD 3470, and HD 3650. When the Radeon HD 3850 and 3870 were introduced, there wasn't same-day Linux support but it had arrived both in open and closed-source forms relatively quickly, but is that the same story for these lower-end solutions? Will the DisplayPort interface on these graphics cards be supported under Linux? In this article, we have answers to these questions.

23 January 2008 - 5 Comments
ASUS Radeon HD 3850 & 3870 TOP

Last month AMD introduced the ATI Radeon HD 3800 series as "enthusiast gaming performance for the masses" through the Radeon HD 3850 and Radeon HD 3870, which are both sub-$250 graphics cards. While rudimentary, the Catalyst 7.11 Linux driver (also released last month), supports these two RV670 GPUs with better support coming through the Catalyst 7.12 Linux driver this month. To see how well these two PCI Express 2.0 graphics cards are able to perform under Linux, ASUS had sent out their EAH3850 TOP and EAH3870 TOP. We have tested both of these graphics cards using Ubuntu 7.10 and have compared the results to other products using the fglrx driver, including the ATI Radeon HD 2900XT 512MB. These are the world's first Linux benchmarks of these new mainstream ATI graphics processors.

16 December 2007 - Add A Comment
Gigabyte GeForce 8600GTS 256MB

Back in July we looked at the Gigabyte GeForce 8600GT graphics card. This midrange GeForce 8 series graphics card came equipped with Gigabyte's Silent-Pipe II cooler, which made for a fan-free experience, while still managing to overclock quite well. In this review today we are looking at its bigger brother, which is the Gigabyte 8600GTS. In addition to using the slightly faster G86 core, the GV-NX86S256H utilizes the Silent-Pipe III cooler. Gigabyte's Silent-Pipe III is much larger than its predecessor while using two large heatpipes.

27 November 2007 - Add A Comment
ASUS GeForce 8600GT 256MB

Earlier this month we looked at the ASUS P5E3 Deluxe WiFi motherboard, which featured a new technology called Express Gate that was an instant-on Linux-based desktop environment that supported a web browser and the Skype VoIP client. This motherboard also featured integrated 802.11n wireless, Intel's X38 Chipset, and a variety of ASUS AI features. However, ASUS innovations are not limited to their motherboards but certainly extend to their wide graphics card selection as well. The EN8600GT OC GEAR/HTDP/256M graphics card is based upon NVIDIA's GeForce 8600GT GPU with ASUS OC Gear. OC Gear? This is the world's first hardware-based real-time overclocking device. The PCI Express graphics card ships with a controller device that can be installed into a 5.25" drive bay and via USB, it's able to overclock the graphics card with a turn of a dial. In this review today we'll tell you how well the ASUS EN8600GT OC Gear graphics card works under Linux.

29 October 2007 - Add A Comment
NVIDIA SLI: Linux vs. Windows

It is going on two years since support for Scalable Link Interface (SLI) was introduced into NVIDIA's Linux binary display driver. This support had come a year after it was officially launched and supported by the Windows ForceWare display driver. As we had seen at the end of 2005 with two GeForce 6 graphics cards in SLI, its performance was very sluggish, and there were a number of problems to be found with Linux SLI. While we have routinely tested new NVIDIA graphics cards under Linux SLI internally, there hasn't been much to report on as the experience has been very foul. However, things have changed recently and with the recent NVIDIA 100.14.19 display driver release using GeForce 8 hardware -- we finally have some modest numbers to report on in a Linux SLI configuration. Linux SLI is still far from perfect, but in this article we've used two GeForce 8600GT graphics cards in an SLI configuration under both Linux and Windows to compare the single and dual GPU performance under both operating systems.

26 September 2007 - 16 Comments
NVIDIA 100.14.19 + 8800GTS 640MB

This past Tuesday NVIDIA finally delivered an updated Linux and Solaris display driver (100.14.19) after they failed to deliver a newer driver since June of this year -- not even a new beta driver! This new software release does, however, contain a number of fixes especially for the GeForce 8 series. After we're all recovered from Intel's Fall 2007 IDF we will follow up with additional NVIDIA benchmarks, but in between IDF parties we benchmarked a GeForce 8800GTS 640MB with the previous 100.14.11 display driver and then the new 100.14.19 driver release. The performance regression fix is very apparent!

20 September 2007 - 1 Comment
ATI HD 2900XT With Open-Source Driver

The open-source Avivo driver is currently bound to supporting the ATI R500 GPU family and with efforts now being focused on the RadeonHD driver, this reverse-engineered driver will likely never support the newer GPUs. However, the RadeonHD driver that was pushed out into the public a few hours ago does support the R600 series. This open-source support does include the flagship ATI Radeon HD 2900XT graphics card. Inside our labs we tried out the Radeon HD 2900XT with the RadeonHD driver on Fedora 7 and it's certainly great to see this progress. The driver still has a climbing road a head, but this driver is already a leap in the right direction.

18 September 2007 - 4 Comments
Radeon HD 2900XT Linux Game-Play

All week we have talked about the performance of the 8.41 display driver and the performance on various ATI graphics cards from the R300 series to the latest R600 graphics card. In some of these articles, we have briefly commented on the image quality, but in this article we will be looking exclusively at the image quality while gaming with the ATI Radeon HD 2900XT 512MB under Linux.

8 September 2007 - 12 Comments
ATI Radeon HD 2400/2600 On Linux

This week has been extremely exciting to say the least. We started by telling you about the AMD 8.41 Display Driver which is largely rewritten and offers Radeon HD 2000 product support, performance improvements, and soon will support AIGLX. Four articles looking at the R300/400, R500, and R600 performance under Linux followed that preview. Then yesterday we told you about AMD's new open-source strategy for supporting Linux and the open-source community. Well, what do we have for you today? With the 8.41 display driver we have completed some additional benchmarks using the Radeon HD 2400PRO 256MB and Radeon HD 2600PRO 256MB graphics cards. In this article, we see if these two mid-range ATI Radeon HD 2000 graphics cards are able to compete against NVIDIA's GeForce 8 series.

7 September 2007 - 8 Comments
ATI Radeon HD 2900XT On Linux

Back when the Radeon X1000 "R500" series support finally arrived for Linux, it came six months after the hardware was actually launched and the Linux performance was down the drain. In some benchmarks the ATI Radeon X1800XL 256MB was outperformed by the earlier Radeon X800XL and was clobbered by the NVIDIA GeForce 7800GTX being as much as four times faster. As we have been sharing all day, the fglrx 8.41 Linux driver finally turns the table where not only the Radeon X1000 performance is finally in order but all of their supported product families received a very nice performance boost. Four months after the availability of the Radeon HD 2900XT, the 8.41 fglrx driver now supports the R600 product family under Linux. We have multiple Radeon HD 2000 "R600" GPUs at hand for testing, but in this article we are focusing upon AMD's current flagship model, the Radeon HD 2900XT 512MB. The performance of the Radeon HD 2900XT under Linux is certainly astonishing after the previous performance shortcomings by ATI/AMD.

5 September 2007 - Add A Comment
ASUS Radeon HD 2600PRO Preview

Two weeks ago we looked at the Radeon HD 2900XT 512MB from Sapphire Technology and in preparation for the new ATI/AMD Linux display driver coming soon, today we are previewing the ASUS EAH2600PRO 256MB graphics card. This PCI Express graphics card has HDMI output support with HDCP compliance, OpenGL 2.0 support, and its core runs at 600MHz with a 1000MHz memory clock. Distinguishing this graphics card from the reference ATI Radeon HD 2600PRO is claims that this ASUS cooling solution is 20 degrees Celsius cooler than the reference model.

20 August 2007 - 1 Comment
Sapphire HD 2900XT 512MB Preview

There is no R600 Linux driver yet, but as we have shared before it is coming later this year. When the Linux support does arrive, we will be delivering same-day Linux benchmarks with a plethora of different graphics cards as well as seeing if the new AMD Linux driver can finally outperform NVIDIA's binary driver and hardware, which for years has been faster under Linux. Among the many graphics cards that we will be using to deliver these initial benchmarks is the Sapphire Radeon HD 2900XT 512MB. In this preview while being stuck with the old driver, we have a few words to say on Sapphire's fastest 512MB GPU aside from what we had shared in our launch-day Radeon HD 2900XT coverage.

11 August 2007 - Add A Comment
Gigabyte GeForce 8600GT 256MB

A few months back we looked at the Gigabyte GeForce 8500GT 256MB graphics card, which was a factory-overclocked $100 graphics card from Gigabyte that came topped with a passively cooled copper heatsink. Today we are back with Gigabyte as we look at their step-up from the 8500GT, which is the 8600GT GV-NX86T256D.

26 July 2007 - 3 Comments
NVIDIA GeForce 8: Linux vs. Windows

When it comes to binary display drivers under Linux, NVIDIA is generally known as the company that's able to offer drivers that are on par with their Windows driver. Unlike the known performance issues with the ATI/AMD fglrx driver where it's not uncommon for the driver to be 50% slower than the Windows Catalyst equivalent, the NVIDIA Linux driver has performed roughly the same if not faster in some cases. This has also been true for the NVIDIA Solaris driver as the performance bastion can largely be attributed to the shared driver code-base between all NVIDIA-supported platforms (Windows, Linux, Solaris, and FreeBSD). However, with the GeForce 8 series we have come across some unusual issues that are limiting the performance of the GeForce 8 series under Linux and Solaris. In this article, we have additional information on these austere performance problems along with benchmarks showing the frame-rate differences between Windows XP and Linux.

18 July 2007 - 2 Comments
AMD Radeon HD 2000 Series & Linux

Since January of this year we have been telling you that AMD has been silently working on R600 (Radeon HD 2000) support for their proprietary Linux "fglrx" driver. However, for the end-user the support isn't complete and still equates to being useless. But how does the recently announced Avivo R500 driver function with the newer R600 series? We have tried out an RV610 GPU in several configurations under Linux, and in this article we will tell you what works and what doesn't right now for the Radeon HD 2000 series.

11 July 2007 - Add A Comment
NVIDIA GeForce 7050

The NVIDIA GeForce 6100 and 6150 integrated graphics processors have been relatively popular among Linux and Windows users. These IGPs have been common in HTPC setups with the NVIDIA driver working out well with MythTV. NVIDIA's GeForce 6100/6150 parts have also appeared in a number of desktop systems, and while these IGPs cannot really handle modern games, they have no troubles with Beryl or Compiz. However, it's now time that the GeForce 6 series moves on with NVIDIA having recently introduced the NVIDIA GeForce 7025 and 7050 with the nForce 630a as the replacement for the GeForce 6100 and 6150 with the nForce 410/430. We have decided to look at the NVIDIA GeForce 7050 today as we compare it to the GeForce 6150 and test it in a variety of Linux graphics benchmarks.

8 July 2007 - 9 Comments
AMD Radeon HD 2400PRO/2600XT

Today AMD has officially released their low-end and mainstream graphics cards in the Radeon HD 2000 family, the Radeon HD 2400 and Radeon HD 2600 series respectively. While these new graphics cards should already be at your favorite retailer or presently in route, where are the Linux drivers? AMD's high-end Radeon HD 2900XT was pushed out the door in early May, but we have yet to see any official support for that or any of the graphics processors in the Radeon HD 2000 series under Linux.

28 June 2007 - Add A Comment
GPUs & Beryl: What is Needed?

We thought it was already clear what graphics processors and drivers work and don't work with Linux desktop eye candy such as Beryl and Compiz, but it seems based upon the number of e-mails we have been receiving along with messages in community bulletin boards that the line isn't so clear after all. For those that have never tried out Beryl, it is a compositing window manager branched from Compiz (though Beryl will merge back with Compiz soon) that provides a variety of window decorations and other desktop "eye candy" for X.Org users. In this article we hope to make it clear for you what GPUs will make your Linux desktop look the most pleasurable and what ones just sweat thinking about these desktop effects. We have taken eight different systems, benchmarked them using the Beryl Benchmark, and have our thoughts on these ATI/AMD, Intel, and NVIDIA solutions with Beryl v0.2.

27 May 2007 - Add A Comment
AMD Radeon HD 2900XT Preview

It's late, but it's finally here. This morning AMD will be formally announcing their long-awaited Radeon HD 2000 series, or perhaps better known as the ATI R600 GPU. The AMD Radeon HD 2000 series features DirectX 10.0 (well, for those that use Microsoft products), Avivo HD, a programmable tessellation unit, CrossFire support, and much more. This morning we have our technology preview of ATI/AMD's next generation GPUs along with what's in store for Linux and the R600 series support.

14 May 2007 - 4 Comments
NVIDIA GeForce 8500GT 256MB

The GeForce 8500GT is NVIDIA's value-priced contender in the GeForce 8 series. The 8500GT has a 450MHz core clock and 400MHz memory clock, but how is this $100 creation able to compete against other graphics cards from ATI and NVIDIA? We have our hands on the passively-cooled Gigabyte GeForce 8500GT 256MB graphics card and have run our usual Linux graphics tests along with some of our first overclocking attempts with this new solution. Without further ado, we present the world's first Linux benchmarks of the NVIDIA GeForce 8500GT.

28 April 2007 - 5 Comments
NVIDIA 100.14.03 Display Driver

We have been waiting and waiting for NVIDIA to release their new Linux display drivers and today we can report that they finally did. Sneaking out of the NVIDIA camp on Friday night was the 100.14.03 Beta driver for Linux. However, at this time there is no 100.14.03 equivalent for FreeBSD or Solaris users.

21 April 2007 - 2 Comments
Linux Image Quality Comparison

With the great deal of articles that we publish in regards to NVIDIA and ATI display drivers, it is very evident that at this time NVIDIA has the lead when it comes to the frame-rate performance -- with their Linux drivers performing nearly the same as their Windows ForceWare counterpart. ATI has been struggling to improve the performance of their fglrx drivers, and while they had made strides last year, they still have a great deal of work ahead of them. However, one of the areas that often is not mentioned in Phoronix articles is the image quality between ATI and NVIDIA's hardware with their respective drivers. In this article today we will be looking at both company's image quality under Linux in video playback and gaming environments.

4 January 2007 - Add A Comment

While NVIDIA has already introduced their G80 8800GTX, after several delays the ATI/AMD camp still has not delivered their next-generation graphics processor: the R600 GPU. While the R600 remains behind closed doors the X1950 remains the fastest Radeon series available. Among the products in the X1950 family is the X1950 CrossFire, X1950PRO, X1950XT, and X1950XTX. What we are looking at today is the X1950PRO, which for this article is coming from ASUS. The ASUS EAX1950PRO offers 256MB of GDDR3, HDCP support, heatpipe-based GPU heatsink, and many more ASUS innovations.

9 December 2006 - Add A Comment

197 graphics cards articles published on Phoronix.