1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Talking To The Developers Of The Unigine Engine

Michael Larabel

Published on 21 May 2009
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 4 of 5 - 23 Comments

Michael: This may a little too technical, but do you use a forward or a deferred renderer? If it is the latter, how did you implement FSAA? Is it done as a custom post-process edge-detect filter, or have you implemented some novel algorithm for this?

Alexander: Unigine uses a combination of forward and deferred rendering, so there is no problem with FSAA or transparency, plus we get benefits of the deferred approach.

Michael: What approach do you take for GI (Global Illumination)? SSAO or something newer/better?

Alexander: We use screen-space ambient occlusion and a special type of lights (probe lights).

Michael: For the game developer, roughly how much does the fully licensed support for the Unigine engine cost? Are there any inexpensive options for indie game developers?

Denis: Current prices are $25k for binary version and $40k for full-source one. We have a special offer for indie developers: they can pay only 20-25% of the price initially to get access to Unigine SDK and technical support, and pay the rest amount of money only after getting major funding from a publisher or other kind of investor. We suppose that these prices are low taking into the account prices for other technologies available on the market.

Michael: How would you compare the Unigine Engine to say id Tech 4, Unreal Engine 3, or other popular game engines?

Denis: That's a hard question because it's rather unethical to talk about our competitors. In general, Unigine is a competitive middleware solution, however CryEngine2 and UE3 have better tools and larger track of records. But there are different numbers of digits in prices for these technologies and Unigine :)

In long-term run we aim to be number one in this field, but it will take years more to achieve it, so we keep working on that.

Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. Intel Xeon E5-1680 v3 & E5-2687W v3 Compared To The Core i7 5960X On Linux
  2. Intel 120GB 530 Series SSD Linux Performance
  3. Btrfs/EXT4/XFS/F2FS RAID 0/1/5/6/10 Linux Benchmarks On Four SSDs
  4. AMD's Windows Catalyst Driver Remains Largely Faster Than Linux Drivers
Latest Linux Articles
  1. NVIDIA vs. Nouveau Drivers With Linux 3.18 + Mesa 10.4-devel
  2. Is The Open-Source NVIDIA Driver Fast Enough For Steam On Linux Gaming?
  3. Linux 3.18 File-System Performance Minimally Changed But Possible Regressions
  4. AMD Radeon Gallium3D Is Catching Up & Sometimes Beating Catalyst On Linux
Latest Linux News
  1. Linux 3.18-rc6 Released, A Worrisome Regression Remains
  2. HandBrake 0.10 Brings H.265 & VP8 Encoders
  3. Gngr: A New Web Browser Focused On Privacy
  4. Linux 3.18 Kernel: Not Much Change With Intel Haswell Performance
  5. More File-System Tests Of The Linux 3.18 Kernel
  6. Using NVIDIA's NVENC On Linux With FFmpeg
  7. There's Talk Again About An "Open To The Core" Ubuntu Laptop
  8. PowerVR SGX Driver Code Gets Leaked
  9. V2 Of KDBUS Published For Linux Kernel Review
  10. VirtualBox 4.3.20 Arrives, Still No Sign Of VirtualBox 4.4
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. PulseAudio 6.0 Is Coming & Other Linux Audio Plans For The Future
  2. Debian Developer Resigns From The Systemd Maintainership Team
  3. Roadmap to Catalyst 14.10 ?
  4. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  5. Cant get working Kaveri APU - A10-7850k
  6. Script for Fan Speed Control
  7. Debian Init System Coupling Vote Results
  8. The Slides Announcing The New "AMDGPU" Kernel Driver