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Tyke Supply Dual LCD Monitor Stand

Michael Larabel

Published on 26 November 2010
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 2 - 3 Comments

The aluminum pole height from the desk is 45cm and the arm length can be adjusted between 40cm and 91cm. The weight of the stand itself is 6.35 kilograms. On the underside of the monitor arm are plastic clips for assisting with cable management. Included with the Tyke Supply stands is everything you need to setup the monitor stand besides the monitors themselves. There are all of the monitor mounting screws included as well as a hex tool for tightening or loosening the monitor arm joints. This multi-screen mount was labeled as model 194B.

My expectations for the Tyke Supply LCD arms/stands were that they would simply be of high-quality construction and offer all of the adjustable pivot/tilt/height capabilities. The LCD stand was successful in that regard, as any stand should be, but its quality was simply superb for the dual LCD version costing just over $40 USD! Having dealt with the expensive Ergotron arms in the past, I was completely blown away by the quality of these products for the price.

Assembling the stand was very easy and just consists of clamping the C-mount to a desk, attaching the arm to the VESA monitor mounts, using the hex tool to clamp the arm to the stand's pole at the given height, and then adjust the arm joints and mounts to your liking. The process for the dual LCD arm takes just about 15 minutes or so. The picture guide shows the arm being connected to the monitor pole first and then attaching the monitors, but I found the best course of action to be attaching the arm to the monitors first and then sliding it on the pole. The monitors attached to this arm were a Dell P2210H DisplayPort Monitor and ASUS VE228H HDMI LED Monitor. The stand was being attached to a glass desk, which worked fine but I ended up reinforcing the C-clamp's mount area with an extra piece of metal as the desk otherwise has a very small area for clamping.

The Tyke Supply 194B Dual LCD Monitor Stand is quite a stunning product. This very affordable (circa $40 USD) metal stand is easily comparable to the features and build quality of the Ergotron stands that cost nearly nine times more! If you are looking for a very affordable multi-monitor stand, the Tyke Supply stands are very much worth considering and can be found at Amazon.com. In fact, there really is not anything about the monitor stand that I do not like or would want changed. A review of the quad LCD monitor stand with some additional thoughts will be published in the coming days, but it is a terrific product too!

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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