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Sumo Omni Reloaded

Michael Larabel

Published on 10 August 2014
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - 11 Comments

Our friends at Sumo are out with another interesting creation that we've had the chance to review and it's already likely our most favorite Sumo product to date. Let's checkout the Sumo Omni Reloaded this weekend.

Every once in a while we enjoy checking out a product that isn't Linux related or specifically computer hardware related for that matter, but proves to be interesting in its own right and worthy of sharing with Phoronix readers. In the past Sumo Lounge has sent over several high-end beanbag chairs that we've tested: the Sumo Omni, Titan, and Emperor we've tried out over the past five years. All three of those beanbag chairs were top notch and worth sharing with Phoronix readers, especially as they're enjoyable to sit in while using a laptop for extended periods of time, gaming on a home console, or simply enjoying a beer after a long day of work. The Omni Reloaded from Sumo is another winner in this category.

Unlike the Omni, Titan, and Emperor, the Omni Reloaded isn't a "beanbag chair" but is composed of a polyurethane foam with 100% polyester exterior. The Omni Reloaded is effectively a very soft chair that can fold into a number of positions with ease. The padding across the entire chair is very soft while allowing the selected chair positions to be maintained is powder coated steel with positional hinges. This polyurethane foam for the filling rather than being a "bean bag" with Sumo beads allows the Omni Reloaded to be very thin and easy to transport while being incredibly versatile. The polyester exterior is also rated for outdoor use with UV and water resistance.

The Omni Reloaded arrived at our new office in a very tall box. While large, the box was at least easier to maneuver than the Titan bean bag, which was a problem even getting through some door ways. The actual lounge chair isn't very heavy and the expanded dimensions on it come at 190 x 70 x 12 cm, or 75 x 28 x 4.7 inches.

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