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SilverStone Strider Gold 750W

Michael Larabel

Published on 20 May 2011
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 3 - 12 Comments

Examination:

The SilverStone Strider Gold 750W was originally a power supply shown off at the beginning of the year during the Consumer Electronics Show (CES2011), but since then SilverStone kindly sent over a review sample. What SilverStone prides itself upon with this power supply is its 80 PLUS Gold efficiency certification, 100% modular cables, a single +12V 62 Amp rail, quality Japanese capacitors, and its range of support (6/8-pin PCI-E, dual EPS 8-pin, ATX 12V 2.3, EPS12V). The power efficiency is rated at 87%~90%.

The Strider Gold 750W has a textured black finish, which like all of SilverStone's products, the finish is very well done. On the bottom of the power supply is a 135mm black fan with a fan grille where the SilverStone logo is prominent in the middle. The rear of the power supply is a grated mesh without any fan or active cooling. The only other item to note on this side is the power connector, which unfortunately is not joined by an on/off switch.

The Strider Gold 750W (SST-ST75F-G) provides 22 Amps on the +3.3V line, 25 Amps on the +5V line, and 62 Amps on the +12V line with a maximum power of 744 Watts. This PSU is rated as a 750W power supply, but its peak power output is 850 Watts. The weight on this power supply is 3.075 kilograms and it is dimensioned at 150 x 86 x 180 mm.

The cables/connectors for the ST75F-G PSU include the 20/24-pin motherboard with a 550mm length, one 4/8-pin EPS 12V at 750mm, one 4/8-pin EPS 12V at 550mm, two 6/8-pin PCI-E at 550mm, two 6-pin PCI-E at 550mm and 700mm, eight Serial ATA connectors at varying lengths six 4-pin molex connectors at varying lengths, and two 4-pin floppy connectors are still around. One interesting note about the PCI Express power cables is that there are 2200 uF capacitors built into the end of the line, which is for providing better voltage stability and ripple/noise performance.

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