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SilverStone Precision PS10

Michael Larabel

Published on 30 June 2014
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - 1 Comment

The Precision PS10 is one of the most affordable ATX enclosures offered by SilverStone Technology. At $50 the expectations weren't incredibly high, but inside the case were surprises for both good and bad.

In the past at Phoronix we have reviewed the Precision PS02 and Precision PS05B as some of their lower-cost cases while still being designed fairly well, so when SilverStone offered the opportunity to look at their latest PS10 model, I agreed. The PS10 is focused upon being "an affordable ATX tower case built for silent operation." This $50 case has USB 3.0 ports, removable fan filters, support for installing water cooling systems, and other nice functionality.

Specifications:

- ATX, Micro-ATX motherboard compatibility
- Steel body, high-strength plastic front panel
- 4 x 5.25-inch external drive bays
- 3.5-inch x 5 or 2.5-inch x 5 drive bays
- 5 x 120mm fan slots (of which two can handle 140mm fans)
- 7 expansion slots
- 2 x USB 3.0, 1 x audio, 1 x microphone front I/O ports
- ATX power supply compatibility
- 6.2KG weight
- 220 x 480 x 522 mm

Other Features:

- Quick access fan filters
- Motherboard back plate opening for easy cleaning
- Side intake vents
- All black painting inside
- Foam-padded side panels for noise absorption
- Highly flexible drive storage options

Contents:

Included with the case are all the fan filters needed for the chassis, though when it comes to cooling only one 120mm front intake fan is included. Also included with the Precision PS10 are all of the necessary mounting screws, standoffs, etc. The manual included with the case was, well, wrong... Found inside the SilverStone PS10 chassis was the product overview for the Antec GX700. (If you encounter the same problem, there is a PDF manual online.)

The Antec GX700 is nearly identical to the SilverStone PS10 with only a few slight differences. Aside from the branding differences, the drive bays are slightly different, the Antec model lacks the side panel foam pads, etc. But for the most part, the GX700 is almost identical to the PS10. With this being a low-end SilverStone chassis, it's probably sourced from the same Chinese facility also supplying the GX700 and likely a snafu at the packaging stage.

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