1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking Benchmarking Platform
Phoromatic Test Orchestration

Sapphire Radeon HD 4650 512MB OC

Michael Larabel

Published on 1 December 2008
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 7 - 12 Comments

We previously had looked at the ATI Radeon HD 4550 and Radeon HD 4670, but if you are looking for a graphics card that's positioned between the two and costs less, there is the Radeon HD 4650. The Radeon HD 4650 is clocked the same as the Radeon HD 4550, but is based upon the RV730PRO GPU and is able to provide a bit more processing power than the lesser RV710 solution. Sapphire though manufactures a Radeon HD 4650 graphics card that operates well beyond the reference core and memory frequencies for the RV730PRO and sells it at a very affordable price. In this article we are seeing how well the Sapphire Radeon HD 4650 512MB OC graphics card can perform under Linux.

Features:

- 650MHz Core Clock / 900MHz Memory Clock
- Dual DVI Connectors
- PCI Express 2.0 Interface
- 512MB 128-bit GDDR3
- Native HDMI Support
- 7.1 Audio Channel Support
- 320 Stream Processing Units
- Unified Video Decoder 2 / Avivo HD

Contents:

The Sapphire Radeon HD 4650 OC arrived in packaging to the previously reviewed Sapphire Radeon HD 4550 and HD 4670. The 512MB of GDDR3 memory is advertised along with this card being an overclocked model, HD video support, PCI Express 2.0 capabilities, HDMI, and other features. Included with the graphics card was a Sapphire driver CD (for Windows XP and Vista only), video output adapter, one composite video adapter, one DVI to VGA adapter, one DVI to HDMI adapter, and lastly there was the quick installation guide. This is essentially the same set of items you will find with inexpensive graphics cards from Sapphire and other AIBs.

Latest Linux News
  1. Linux Benchmarks Of Intel's Atom Z3735F On The Compute Stick
  2. Fedora's Security Team Continues Closing Old Vulnerabilities
  3. HAMMER2 File-System Now Uses LZ4 Compression By Default
  4. HiSense Chromebook Benchmarks When Running Ubuntu Linux
  5. Mandriva Linux Was Allegedly Brought Down By Employee Lawsuits
  6. GNOME 3.17.2 Is Released As The Latest Look Towards GNOME 3.18
  7. Phoronix Turns 11 Years Old Next Week: How Should We Celebrate?
  8. Ubuntu Community Council Reaffirms Its Decision Against Kubuntu's Leader
  9. Future Plans For Changing Fedora's Installer
  10. Confusion Mounts Over Wayland's Actual License
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Btrfs RAID 0/1/5/6/10 Five-Disk Benchmarks On Linux 4.1
  2. Opening The Gates To Our Daily Open-Source Linux Benchmark Results
  3. The Latest Features For Linux Performance Management + Benchmark Monitoring
  4. Noctua NH-U12DX i4 + NF-F12
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. NVIDIA's Proprietary Driver Is Moving Closer With Kernel Mode-Setting
  2. Features Added To Mesa 10.6 For Open-Source GPU Drivers
  3. Ubuntu's LXD vs. KVM For The Linux Cloud
  4. Friction Building Around An Ubuntu Community Council Decision
  5. The Latest Linux Kernel Git Code Fixes The EXT4 RAID0 Corruption Problem
  6. The CompuLab Fitlet Is A Neat Little Linux PC With AMD SoC
  7. Russia's Baikal Chips End Up Going For A MIPS CPU
  8. Linux 4.1-rc5 Kernel Released