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Samsung NC10 Netbook

Michael Larabel

Published on 4 January 2009
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 11 - 26 Comments

It seems that each and every week there are new netbooks that are introduced, but there are not many differences between most models. Some netbooks will have a slightly longer battery life, a different exterior, or a solid-state drive, but there are more similarities than differences. However, one of the latest companies to join the netbook bandwagon here in the United States has been Samsung with the introduction of the NC10. Is there anything special about this 10.2-inch Atom-powered netbook? We will tell you in this Linux review of the Samsung NC10.

The Samsung NC10 is available with black, white, and blue exteriors, but besides that, the US models don't have any other options -- such as choosing between a HDD and SSD or a Linux operating system versus Windows. An Intel Atom N270 is used by the NC10, which is the most common processor found in today's netbooks and is clocked at 1.60GHz. This Intel netbook has a 10.2" WSVGA 1024 x 600 display, Intel graphics, a 160GB 5400RPM HDD, and 1GB of DDR2-800 memory. This netbook also has a 1.3 megapixel integrated web camera, 802.11b/g WiFi, and Bluetooth 2.0. The dimensions for the Samsung NC10 are 10.2" x 7.3" x 1.2" and the overall weight is 2.8lbs.

We ordered the Samsung NC10-14GB for our testing, which happens to be the blue model. The packaging for the NC10 isn't flashy like the ASUS Eee PC 901 or some other netbooks, but it's effective. Inside the cardboard box there was a Styrofoam mold protecting the netbook itself while there was also a smaller cardboard box that held the 6-cell battery, AC adapter, carrying case, product CDs, and manuals.

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