1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Bam! Phoromatic 1.0 Unleashed & Ubuntu Joins The Party

Michael Larabel

Published on 17 March 2010
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 2 - 8 Comments

Phoromatic, our remote test management system that makes it incredibly simple to deploy the Phoronix Test Suite across an array of systems within an organization or around the world, has been in development for more than a year. We publicly announced this unique enterprise solution when developing Phoronix Test Suite 2.0 and it publicly went into beta with Phoronix Test Suite 2.2 where it became possible to easily build a benchmarking test farm using our Phoronix software. Before ending out the year we launched Phoromatic Tracker with an initial reference implementation to monitor the Linux kernel performance on a daily basis and in a fully automated manner. Phoromatic has been a huge success, but today we are announcing that Phoromatic has reached a 1.0 status and additionally we are providing the Ubuntu Linux community with a new performance tracker in collaboration with Canonical.

Since Phoromatic went into public beta, we have continued to invest significant resources in enriching its capabilities, and of course the Phoronix Test Suite itself. These improvements range from Valentine's Day improvements to other features mentioned during our talk at this year's Southern California Linux Expo entitled The Five Stages of Benchmark Loss. As we alluded to last week, this month we have been working to push Phoromatic and Phoromatic Tracker to the next level and make it an even more innovative and rich platform for conducting automated tests in conjunction with the Phoronix Test Suite.

While we encourage you to experiment with Phoromatic to learn all of its abilities, some of the recent additions include the ability to generate composite graphs, the ability to narrow down the graphs that are shown, view real-time information about Phoromatic test systems, an RSS feed of new test result uploads, a feature-rich results table, an integrated system log viewer, and much more. The composite graphs show information like the geometric mean, harmonic mean, and aggregate sum for all test data on a given day. Rather than having to scroll through many (dozens in some instances like with our public trackers) you can simply look at a few graphs to look for any change in performance to determine whether to dig deeper and look at the individual test results for a given day / test run. With Phoromatic Tracker you can now also easily select what type of tests to show. If you just care about X.Org or the graphics performance, simply select that and you will only be exposed to that relevant data and nothing more. Below is an image of one of these result tables from the Phoromatic Kernel Tracker.

This table may overload you a bit with all of the information that is exposed as it is showing the Linux kernel test results on a daily basis going back 30 days for about 60 tests each day and with three systems. Of course, this is all configurable through the Phoromatic Tracker interface to view the data on select days or for specific systems. You can even view a table for all data, in which case it goes back to the start of December, if you so desire. This table is already quite rich as it shows of all of the data, but it also highlights the numbers it finds to be statistically important. With the kernel tests that are run everyday, when there is a change (whether it be positive or negative) it determines whether it is statistically significant in that it is greater than individual test's standard deviation on that given day for where tests are run multiple times (this is on top of the Phoronix Test Suite already doing its part to ensure statistical significance). If the change is found to be significant, the number is highlighted in red if it is a negative regression or blue if it is actually a performance boost. It really cannot get much easier for someone looking to analyze performance results!

<< Previous Page
1
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. AMD Launches New FX CPUs, Cuts Prices On Existing Processors
  2. Preview: AMD's FX-9590 Eight-Core At Up To 5.0GHz On Linux
  3. Intel Launches The Core i7 5960X, Mighty Powerful Haswell-E CPUs
  4. AMD Radeon R9 290: Gallium3D vs. Catalyst Drivers
Latest Linux Articles
  1. Ondemand vs. Performance CPU Governing For AMD FX CPUs On Linux 3.17
  2. How Intel Graphics On Linux Compare To Open-Source AMD/NVIDIA Drivers
  3. The Fastest NVIDIA GPUs For Open-Source Nouveau With Steam Linux Gaming
  4. Testing For The Latest Linux Kernel Power Regression
Latest Linux News
  1. New Group Calls For Boycotting Systemd
  2. The Features To Find With The Imminent Release Of LLVM/Clang 3.5
  3. Borderlands 2 Is Coming To Linux
  4. The Witcher 2 Ups The Performance More & Works Around Catalyst Bug
  5. Running Gallium3D's LLVMpipe On The Eight-Core 5GHz CPU
  6. Trying Intel OpenCL On Linux For Video Encoding
  7. GSoC 2014 Yielded Some Improvements For Mesa/X.Org This Year
  8. webOS Lives On As LuneOS With New Release
  9. Marek Lands Radeon Gallium3D HyperZ Improvements
  10. Mozilla Firefox 32 Surfaces With HTML5, Developer Changes
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Lennart Poettering Talks Up His New Linux Vision That Involves Btrfs
  2. nv and xorg.conf under Debian PPC
  3. AMD graphics doesn't work with AMD Catalyst drivers
  4. Best Radeon for a Power Mac G5?
  5. The dangers of Linux kernel development
  6. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  7. AMD Releases UVD Video Decode Support For R600 GPUs
  8. SSD seems slow