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Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

What OpenBenchmarking.org Is About & Why It Matters

Michael Larabel

Published on 2 February 2011
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 4 of 5 - 11 Comments

Registered users can comment on test results, test profiles, test suites, and even search results. Where this search though differs greatly from forums or Hardware Compatibility Lists is the precise focus and detail. With a forum or HCL-type databases, you are dependent upon a user posting a question/comment in a particular section and then finding yourself lucky that an owner of the said hardware will come across that question. With OpenBenchmarking.org, if a potential customer of " Graphics Card XYZ" posts a question asking if "Feature 123" is implemented in the open-source driver for this graphics card, depending upon each user's notification settings, OpenBenchmarking.org can proactively send a notification to those users that have or had " Graphics Card XYZ" informing them another user has a question, comment, or suggestion based upon their settings. Other users that flag "Feature 123" as something they are involved in or of interest to them can also be notified. All of this work is leading up to the largest global test farm.


OpenBenchmarking.org also attempts to identify interesting result files, multi-way comparisons, and other result features to provide the user with a pleasant and optimal experience.

With the exception of using external product pricing APIs, all of the OpenBenchmarking.org IP was developed in-house. OpenBenchmarking.org leverages the Phoronix Test Suite and its components (pts-core, pts_Graph, nye_Xml, Phodevi, etc) along with Phoromatic components and other Phoronix Media technologies like PHXCMS and Cekora. The OpenBenchmarking.org code-base was written by Michael Larabel with input from Matthew Tippett.


When OpenBenchmarking.org is able to recognize what component(s) are being compared, it even attempts to enhance the user-experience by pulling in the real-time pricing data on the components being compared. It can go a step further too and even nornalize all of the compared test results against the current prices of the said component, so you as a consumer can quickly and effectively find the best "bang for your buck" whether it's for a graphics card on an open-source driver, a GPU with a closed-source driver, or another type of hardware.

Phoronix Global results are accessible from OpenBenchmarking.org. Results that continue to be uploaded to Phoronix Global are immediately available on OpenBenchmarking.org while being able to take advantage of some of the features like the much greater search capabilities, but not all features are available for these pre-Iveland results.

OpenBenchmarking.org is completely extensible. Any free software project can take advantage of any of these features for their own testing purposes by simply writing a test profile / suite that compiles with our public specifications. Technically, any benchmarking client can also implement this benchmarking platform and take advantage of this entire framework as well. An external API is also being developed for a later release.


A lot of features are at your disposal and the list will only continue to grow longer.

There's enough structured data at hand that OpenBenchmarking.org can automatically report on approximate age of hardware, new product launches, auto-recognition of vendors and product series, auto-component detection, and much more. When searching for a CPU, for example, it can also provide a number of possible CPU coolers that are deemed popular.

Results can also be exported as text / CSV, XML, or to a PDF file.

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