1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking Benchmarking Platform
Phoromatic Test Orchestration

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 On Linux

Michael Larabel

Published on 23 October 2013
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 4 of 11 - 20 Comments

The MSI GeForce GTX 650 testing immediately followed my AMD Radeon R9 270X On Linux review and builds upon that data plus I also tossed in some other lower-end AMD/NVIDIA graphics cards.

The complete line-up of AMD / NVIDIA graphics cards tested included:

- GeForce 9800GT
- GeForce GT 240
- GeForce GTX 460
- GeForce GT 520
- GeForce GTX 550 Ti
- GeForce GTX 650 (the MSI review card)
- GeForce GTX 680
- Radeon HD 5830
- Radeon HD 6770
- Radeon HD 6870
- Radeon HD 6950
- Radeon HD 7850
- Radeon HD 7950
- Radeon R9 270X

Unfortunately, due to the NVIDIA driver lacking Kepler overclocking support, the GeForce GTX 650 was only tested at its MSI-set clock speeds. Sadly, NVIDIA PR/marketing still seems uninterested in Linux coverage of enthusiast graphics cards so this year-old-GPU had to be purchased retail and wasn't supplied as a review sample. For more information on the NVIDIA Linux struggles, see this previous review's information. Thanks to those that subscribe to Phoronix Premium or make a PayPal tip to allow hardware in these cases to be purchased.

All of this AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics card benchmarking was done from our Core i7 4770K "Haswell" system with OCZ SSD and 16GB of RAM. Ubuntu 13.04 x86_64 was done with the Linux 3.10 kernel and the Catalyst 13.11 Beta and NVIDIA 331.13 Beta graphics drivers. All Linux OpenGL benchmarking for this article was done via the Phoronix Test Suite, including the thermal and power-consumption/performance-per-Watt results that follow the normal results.

Latest Linux News
  1. NVIDIA's Proprietary Driver Is Moving Closer With Kernel Mode-Setting
  2. The Latest Linux Kernel Git Code Fixes The EXT4 RAID0 Corruption Problem
  3. Features Added To Mesa 10.6 For Open-Source GPU Drivers
  4. Ubuntu's LXD vs. KVM For The Linux Cloud
  5. Fedora Server 22 Benchmarks With XFS & The Linux 4.0 Kernel
  6. GCC 6 Gets Support For The IBM z13 Mainframe Server
  7. Fedora 22 Is Being Released Next Tuesday
  8. OpenWRT 15.05 Preparing Improved Security & Better Networking
  9. Using The New LLVM/Clang OpenMP Support
  10. Zapcc Claims To Be A "Much Faster C++ Compiler"
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Btrfs RAID 0/1 Benchmarks On The Linux 4.1 Kernel
  2. The State Of Various Firefox Features
  3. Intel Iris Graphics Performance With Mesa 10.6
  4. Fedora Workstation 22 Is Looking Great, Running Fantastic
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. The Linux 4.0 Kernel Currently Has An EXT4 Corruption Issue
  2. The Linux 4.0 EXT4 RAID Corruption Bug Has Been Uncovered
  3. AMDGPU Open-Source Driver Code Continues Maturing
  4. Microsoft Open-Sources The Windows Communication Foundation
  5. Another HTTPS Vulnerability Rattles The Internet
  6. LibreOffice 5.0 Open-Source Office Suite Has Been Branched
  7. Systemd 220 Has Finally Been Released
  8. Will Ubuntu Linux Hit 200 Million Users This Year?