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Mionix Saiph 3200 Laser Gaming Mouse

Michael Larabel

Published on 2 October 2009
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - 4 Comments

Most often we are faced with testing out the latest motherboards, processors, and graphics cards to see how well they work with Linux under different conditions and a variety of tests. While those are obviously the components that most Linux users are concerned with when it comes to Linux compatibility and performance, plenty of peripherals to this day don't work under Linux or will only do so to a limited extent or after jumping through various hurdles to get a half-working device. With mice for instance, they generally will work fine when plugged into any modern desktop Linux distribution, but with some of the gaming and high-end input devices not all of the buttons will be detected or other features will not work. When a company came along that we never heard of, Mionix, claiming to offer some of the best gaming products, curiosity got the best of us and we decided to see how well the Saiph 3200 from this unheard of company would work on the Linux desktop.

The Mionix Saiph 3200 is advertised as having an ergonomic design, offers in-game DPI adjustment, a weight tuning system, and a 1.8mm lift distance. However, some of the other features for this mouse include a 3200 DPI laser sensor, seven buttons (five programmable), built-in memory, and large Teflon feet. The 3200 DPI laser sensor on the Saiph 3200 has a 1ms response time, 1000Hz polling rate, a 16-bit data path, 20G acceleration, 40,000Hz sampling rate, and a tracking speed of 127m/sec.

As was said earlier, Mionix is a company we never heard of before, but they were founded just back in 2007. Mionix is a Swedish company whose goal is to "develop gaming gear with high performance and suitability for all type of players. Mionix stands for quality, design and a touch of innovation." The current Mionix product selection includes the Saiph 1800 and Saiph 3200 mice, the Keid 20 B and Keid 20 W headphones, Alioth 320 and Alioth 400 mouse pads, and lastly they sell a set of MouseGlidez.

The Mionix Saiph 3200 arrived in a cardboard package that was colored black and on the back advertised the various features of this laser gaming mouse. The front side of the package also flips up to offer a view of the mouse itself. This packaging reminded us a bit of how Razer is known to package their gaming mice as well. Found inside the package was just the mouse itself and not any driver CDs, user's manual, "certificate of authenticity", or any other items commonly included with high-end gaming mice. Mionix products are backed by a two-year warranty against defects.

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