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Phoronix Test Suite

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Mionix Naos 3200 Mouse

Michael Larabel

Published on 9 November 2010
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 2 - 3 Comments

A few weeks back we reviewed the Swedish-made Excito B3 Mini ARM Server, which we liked for its capabilities and hardware, until it overheated. Today we are reviewing another product from a Swedish company, Mionix AB, as we try out the Naos 3200 computer mouse. This is coming more than a year after reviewing our first Mionix product, the Saiph 3200 Laser Gaming Mouse.

Features
- Truly ergonomic design
- Grip friendly rubber coating
- 7 buttons (7 programmable)
- 3 steps in-game dpi adjustment
- Configurable dpi up to 3200 dpi
- Adjustable polling rate
- Built-in memory
- Large Teflon feet
- Gold-plated USB connection
- Full speed USB 2.0 with Plug n Play
- Cable length: 2 m (braided for durability)
- Compatible with all kinds of surfaces

Sensor Specifications
- 3200 dpi gaming LED-optical sensor
- 3.5mm lift distance
- 1 ms response time
- 6469 frames/sec
- Tracking speed: 1 m/sec (40 IPS)
- 5.8 mega-pixels/sec image processing
- Acceleration: 15 g
- True 16-bit data path

The Mionix Naos 3200 arrived in a cardboard box similar to most other mice on the market, especially those marketed towards gamers, with a flip-out front panel to get an actual view of the mouse. Included with the 3200DPI mouse was solely a small user pamphlet. The Microsoft Windows drivers, firmware updates, and Mionix software for this mouse are available through their web-site along with the user's manual. There are no custom Linux drivers or software for Minonix products, but that is not surprising. Besides the Naos 3200 there is also a Mionix Naos 5000 model as well with a 5000DPI sensor.

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