1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Linux KVM vs. VirtualBox 4.0 Virtualization Benchmarks

Michael Larabel

Published on 13 December 2010
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 7 - 27 Comments

Oracle's been vigorously working on their VM VirtualBox 4.0 software and in just the past week they have delivered two public betas that bring a number of new features. Among the changes there is support for Intel HD audio / ICH9 to guest VMs, the concept of extension packs, user-interface improvements, support for limiting a virtual machine's CPU time and I/O bandwidth, 3D acceleration fixes for guests, and a great number of bug-fixes. How though is this updated Oracle/Sun virtualization platform comparing to the older VirtualBox 3.2 release and that of the upstream Linux KVM (the Kernel-based Virtual Machine) that most Linux distributions rely upon? Here are a number of benchmarks that seek to answer this very question.

We have carried out a number of benchmarks under VirtualBox 3.2.12, VirtualBox 4.0 Beta 2, KVM in the Linux 2.6.35 kernel, and atop the actual system's host operating system. The tests we carried out in the four different configurations for looking at the Linux virtualization performance were Apache, SQLite, PostMark, FS-Mark, 7-Zip, Parallel BZIP2, C-Ray, GnuPG, OpenSSL, Gcrypt, Ogg, x264, FFmpeg, TCP Network Performance, timed Apache compilation under GCC, Bullet Physics Engine, and NAS Parallel Benchmarks. All of these tests were managed and executed by the Phoronix Test Suite.

The system used for this Linux virtualization benchmarking was based around the new Intel Core i7 970 Gulftown processor with six physical threads plus Hyper Threading to provide a logical count of 12 threads and a core clock of 3.20GHz. The motherboard was an ASRock X58 SuperComputer with 3GB of system memory, a 320GB Seagate ST3320620AS SATA HDD, and a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 graphics card.

When running our automated virtualization tests under the different configurations we allowed the guests access to all 12 processor threads and limited the VMs to 1.5GB of system RAM (per the maximum "optimal settings" under VirtualBox for this system). The KVM testing was done with QEMU and Virt-Manager. The stock settings besides that were used throughout the testing process and on the host itself. The software stack on both the host and guests were Ubuntu 10.10 (x86_64) with the Linux 2.6.35-22-generic kernel, GNOME 2.32.0, X.Org Server 1.9.0, GCC 4.4.5, and the EXT4 file-system. With the VirtualBox testing the respective "Guest Additions" were installed for each release.

Without further ado, let us see how these virtualization systems compare.

<< Previous Page
1
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. Intel Launches The Core i7 5960X, Mighty Powerful Haswell-E CPUs
  2. AMD Radeon R9 290: Gallium3D vs. Catalyst Drivers
  3. AMD Radeon R9 290 Open-Source Driver Works, But Has A Ways To Go
  4. Trying The Configurable 45 Watt TDP With AMD's A10-7800 / A6-7400K
Latest Linux Articles
  1. The Fastest NVIDIA GPUs For Open-Source Nouveau With Steam Linux Gaming
  2. Testing For The Latest Linux Kernel Power Regression
  3. The Most Energy Efficient Radeon GPU For AMD Linux Gaming
  4. 20-Way Radeon Comparison With Open-Source Graphics For Steam On Linux Gaming
Latest Linux News
  1. Intel Beignet Is Working Out Surprisingly Well For OpenCL On Linux
  2. Coreboot Adds Lenovo X220 With Native Sandy Bridge Support
  3. Canonical Has Yet To Land X.Org Server 1.16 For Ubuntu 14.10
  4. Imagination Launches A MIPS Development Board
  5. Getting Involved With The New Raspberry Pi Graphics Driver
  6. A New AMD Catalyst Linux Driver Unofficially Surfaces
  7. LibreOffice Ported To 64-bit ARM (AArch64)
  8. Enlightenment E19 RC3 Shows Off The New Wayland Compositor
  9. Metro Redux Is Going To Require OpenGL 4.x On Linux
  10. Jailhouse v0.1 Released As A Basic Hypervisor For Linux
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Btrfs Gets Talked Up, Googler Encourages You To Try Btrfs
  2. Updated graphics drivers for Ubuntu 12.04 Precise LTS
  3. Catalyst 14.201.1008
  4. It's Now Possible To Play Netflix Natively On Linux Without Wine Plug-Ins
  5. Users defect to Linux as OpenBSD removes Lynx from base system
  6. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  7. Canonical Joined The Khronos Group To Help Mir/Wayland Drivers
  8. Radeon HD5670 and Ubuntu 14.04