1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

LGP Introduces Linux Game Copy Protection

Michael Larabel

Published on 23 June 2008
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - 284 Comments

For seven years Linux Game Publishing has been selling their Linux-ported games with no form of copy protection on their CD/DVDs, but beginning with their forthcoming port of Sacred: Gold that will be changed. Linux Game Publishing has developed their own Internet-based game copy protection system for Linux, and in this article we have more details on this scheme as well as their motives behind this work.

LGP's new copy protection system isn't a kernel module that needs to be loaded or any CD/DVD-embedded protection like StarForce. LGP's system is Internet-based with loop-back protection. Anyone can put the game on their system, as LGP's new (Loki-based) installer isn't modified as part of this piracy-prevention scheme, but they will not be able to launch the game unless a valid key and password are provided. This information is then validated against LGP's servers (with SSL). If the key/password combination is verified, then it will launch the game.

When launching the game for the first time -- and on a routine basis thereafter -- is the "LGP Security System Manager" input box for entering the game's key. For Sacred: Gold, the key is 20 characters long with four dashes.

After entering the key for the first time, a password must be supplied. This password allows the user to install the game they purchased legitimately on more than one computer, as long as the user remembers their password for each game.

LGP's system does help users who have forgotten their passwords by having an email system in place to send reminders.

Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Samsung 850 EVO SSD Linux Benchmarks
  2. Kubuntu 15.04 Is Turning Out Quite Nice, Good Way To Try Out The Latest KDE
  3. 5-Way Linux Distribution Comparison On The Core i3 NUC
  4. OCZ ARC 100 Linux SSD Benchmarks
  5. Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Works Great As A Linux Ultrabook
  6. Transcend SSD370 256GB
Latest Linux News
  1. OpenBSD Sponsors Work For Better Browser Security
  2. Improved ODF Reading Support Comes To KDE's Calligra
  3. Another Step Closer On The New Linux Benchmarking Test Farm
  4. Confirmed: Vulkan Is The Next-Gen Graphics API
  5. Kdenlive Ported To Qt5/KF5, Coming To KDE Applications 15.04
  6. HTC & Valve Partnered Up For The Steam VR Headset
  7. 8cc: A Small C11 Compiler
  8. Not Everyone Likes The Possible "VULKAN" Name For Next-Gen OpenGL
  9. The Binary Blobs Making Up Coreboot
  10. Linux 4.0 & LLVM vs. GCC Yielded Much Interest This Month
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. Screenshots Of The GNOME 3.16 Changes
  2. More Proof That Allwinner Is Violating The GPL
  3. The Tremendous Features Of Fedora 22
  4. Krita 2.9 Released, Their Biggest Release Ever
  5. A Single UEFI Executable With The Linux Kernel, Initrd & Command Line
  6. Linux 4.0 Doesn't Have The Weirdest Codename
  7. Canonical Comes Up With Its Own FUSE Filesystem For Linux Containers
  8. Firefox 36 Brings Full HTTP/2 Support
%%CLICK_URL_UNESC%%