1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

There's Interest In Building The Linux Kernel With Clang

Michael Larabel

Published on 5 April 2012
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - 9 Comments

There's growing interest in being able to build the mainline Linux kernel with the LLVM/Clang compiler as an alternative to the kernel's long-standing love-affair with GCC.

Mark Charlebois and David Kipping of Qualcomm talked this morning at this week's Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit about their interest in LLVM and Clang for the ARM platform, per Qualcomm's obvious interests. Additionally, Mark Charlebois has been working hard at getting the mainline Linux kernel to build under LLVM/Clang for the ARM architecture.

For those that don't remember, in late 2010 there was the original undertaking of using LLVM Clang to build the Linux kernel. When not building all kernel drivers and other components, plus applying some out-of-tree patches, there was success in building a Clang-ified Linux kernel.

Bryce Lelbach was the developer working on making Clang supported by the Linux kernel. At last year's Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit he presented on this work during the LLVM track, but since then there's been really nothing to report on the matter. Building the mainline Linux kernel with a mainline LLVM/Clang compiler is still not possible.

As far as why Qualcomm's Innovation Center is now getting behind LLVM/Clang for the Linux kernel, there's several reasons, among which is they've always been fond towards LLVM. Of the benefits they see for bringing up their ARM Linux kernel on Clang is that there's better diagnostics (error reporting / warnings, catching things GCC doesn't), Clang provides some level of "fix-it hints", and Clang's static analyzer is extremely powerful.

Mark Charlebois also mentioned how Qualcomm likes LLVM's flexibility, targeting all "cores" of ARM SoCs, having one code generator for many different environments, etc. "We want a single compiler toolchain."

<< Previous Page
1
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. AMD's New Athlon/Semprons Give Old Phenom CPUs A Big Run For The Money
  2. 13-Way Low-End GPU Comparison With AMD's AM1 Athlon
  3. ASUS AM1I-A: A Mini-ITX Board For Socketed Kabini APUs
  4. Mini-Box M350: A Simple, Affordable Mini-ITX Case
Latest Linux Articles
  1. How Much Video RAM Is Needed For Catalyst R3 Graphics?
  2. Ubuntu 12.04 LTS vs. 14.04 LTS Cloud Benchmarks
  3. Ubuntu 12.04.4 vs. 13.10 vs. 14.04 LTS Desktop Benchmarks
  4. AMD OpenCL Performance With AM1 Kabini APUs
Latest Linux News
  1. Packard Bell LM85 Now Supported By Coreboot
  2. AmazonBasics External USB 2.0 DVD Writer For Linux
  3. TP-LINK TG-3468: A $12 Linux PCI-E Gigabit Network Adapter
  4. Linux 3.15 Lands Some DRM Graphics Driver Fixes
  5. AMD Is Disabling DPM Support For RV770 GPUs
  6. ReactOS Working On A Community Windows OS
  7. eRacks Keeps Pushing Linux, Open-Source Systems After 15 Years
  8. Borderlands Is Being Considered For Linux
  9. Mesa 10.0 & 10.1 Stable Get Updated
  10. Git 2.0 Test Releases Begin With Many Changes
  11. Wine 1.7.17 Works On Its Task Scheduler, C Run-Time
  12. The Improv ARM Board Still Isn't Shipping; Riding A Dead Horse?
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. The GNOME Foundation Is Running Short On Money
  2. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  3. Catalyst 14.3 Beta
  4. Suggestions about how to make a Radeon HD 7790 work decently?
  5. Radeon 8000M problematic on Linux?
  6. Linux Kernel Developers Fed Up With Ridiculous Bugs In Systemd
  7. After Jack Keane, RuseSoft will briing Ankh 3 to Linux through Desura
  8. Suspected PHP Proxy Issue