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Phoronix Test Suite

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Kingston SSDNow V300 120GB SATA 3.0 SSD

Michael Larabel

Published on 21 January 2014
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 5 - 36 Comments

For those in the market for a solid-state drive, the Kingston SSDNow V300 series offers a 120GB Serial ATA 3.0 SSD for less than $90 USD. How well does this SSD work on Linux? We have benchmarks at Phoronix done under Ubuntu and compared to a range of HDD and SSDs.

Those that follow my Twitter feed know that I've been busy in recent weeks on Phoronix Test Suite 5.0 and establishing the new Phoromatic / OpenBenchmarking.org test farm. As part of dedicating a few more machines to publicly benchmarking some high profile open-source projects on a daily basis, I picked up a few more disk drives, among which was the Kingston SSDNow V300. The 120GB Kingston SSDNow V300 can be found online for $89 USD, which is quite a bargain given today's SSD prices and this drive normally retailing for around $110 USD. Prior to setting up the SSD in one of the new test machines I ran some comparison benchmarks to get an idea for the drive's performance should anyone else be interested in the Kingston SSDNow series; this is our first time testing a Kingston SSD at Phoronix.

The 2.5-inch SSD with 120GB storage capacity claims maximum sequential read speeds up to 450MB/s, sequential write speeds up to 450 MB/s, up to 85,000 IOPS in 4KB random reads, and up to 55,000 IOPS in 4K random writes. The MTBF on this Kingston SATA3 SSD is 1,000,000 hours. The controller on this SSD is an LSI SandForce SF-2281 and this solid-state drive uses MLC NAND flash chips. Kingston provides a three-year warranty on the drive.

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