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Intel Core i5 750, Core i7 870 Linux Benchmarks

Michael Larabel

Published on 8 September 2009
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 15 - 76 Comments

Now that we have provided a brief overview of the Intel P55 and how it functions under Linux, our larger area of concentration is looking at the Linux performance of the P55 with the new Core i5 750 and Core i7 870 processors. We have a number of benchmarks in this article along with more information on these Lynnfield processors.

The key features that Intel highlights for its new Core i5 processor family is quad-core processing, Intel Turbo Boost Technology, 8MB Intel Smart Cache, Integrated (DDR3) Memory Controller, and Intel HD Boost. The inaugural Core i5 processor is the 750 model that is clocked at 2.66GHz, has 8MB of smart cache, up to 3.20GHz for its Turbo Boost frequency, four threads (the Core i5 lacks Hyper Threading), and an integrated dual channel DDR3-1333MHz memory controller. The Core i7 800 series processors share many features with the Core i7 900 series that have been out on the market for a while with X58 motherboards, except for lower clock frequencies, a dual channel DDR3 memory controller instead of a triple channel controller, and a LGA-1156 socket versus LGA-1366. Lynnfield also uses DMI (Direct Media Interface) rather than QPI (QuickPath Interconnect) as found on the Core i7 900 series.

There are approximately 774 million transistors with the Lynnfield processors. While the Core i5 series is behind the Core i7 in regards to performance and positioning within the market place, it is ahead of the Core i3 series, which is expected to be unveiled in the fourth quarter of this year and will eventually replace Intel's Celeron family.

The two processors we received that came courtesy of Intel were marked on one Intel Confidential, Q3AJ ES MALAY, BV80605001905AI, and L918B247. Marked on the other Lynnfield processor was Intel Confidential, Q3AN ES MALAY, BV80605001911AP, and L920B465.

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