1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Intel Core i7 4770K "Haswell" Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

Michael Larabel

Published on 4 June 2013
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 8 - 75 Comments

This past weekend I shared the first experiences of running Intel's new Haswell CPU on Linux. While Intel Haswell is a beast and brings many new features and innovations to the new Core CPUs succeeding Ivy Bridge, there were a few shortcomings with the initial Linux support. It still appears that the Core i7 4770K is still being finicky at times for both the processor and graphics, but in this article are the first benchmarks. Up today are benchmarks of the Intel Core i7 4770K when running Ubuntu 13.04 with the Linux 3.10 kernel.

I went over the initial Intel Haswell Linux details on Saturday. The initial support is there and overall it's in fairly good standing and roughly comparable to where things were at in 2012 when Ivy Bridge launched. However, as far as where the support is at in currently released Linux distributions, there's a lot better support to find out of the very latest upstream code. With the widely used Ubuntu 13.04, Haswell processors will work, but better support, features, and performance can be found with code not currently available through the standard repositories. This state is comparable to that of other Linux distributions released so far this year. Polished Haswell support coming to an "out of the box" Linux desktop won't really be there until later in H2'2013.

In terms of what versions are best for Haswell, some key packages include the Linux 3.10 kernel, Mesa 9.2 (what may be released as Mesa 10.0), GCC 4.8.1, and LLVM 3.3. The latest kernel will yield not only faster performance if relying upon Haswell graphics, but it offers all of the latest bug-fixes, the best power-savings currently available to this latest Intel hardware, and has been running well from my tests in the past few weeks. The Linux 3.11 kernel will also offer additional improvements.

Anyhow, for seeing how the Intel Core i7 4770K "Haswell" processor currently performs under Linux, in this article is a selection of CPU benchmarks against older Intel Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge CPUs along with AMD CPU/APUs. The Intel hardware being benchmarked were the Core i3 2120, i5 2400S, i5 2500K, i5 3470, and i7 3770K. The AMD CPUs tested were an AMD A10-5800K APU and an AMD VX-8350 Vishera CPU.

The motherboard used for the Intel Haswell testing was the DH87RL micro-ATX motherboard. Intel hadn't sent out their enthusiast motherboard for Haswell that they sent to other review sites, so I ended up having to buy their Haswell Round Lake H87 motherboard, which isn't too overclocking friendly. As a result, no Haswell overclocking results under Linux are being shared in this article. For all the Sandy/Ivy Bridge CPU testing, the same Z77H2-A2X motherboard was used. All other system components (16GB DDR3, 240GB OCZ Vertex 3 SSD, SilverStone PSU, etc) was used for testing all of the Intel/AMD processors. The only other exception was having to install a discrete graphics card for the AMD FX-8350 testing, but no graphics tests are being shared in this article but will be published later today or tomorrow to look at the Haswell Linux OpenGL performance.

The software stack remained the same during testing and was Ubuntu 13.04 x86_64 with the Linux 3.10 Git kernel, Unity 7.0.0, Mesa 9.2 Git, GCC 4.8.1, and LLVM 3.2. All processor benchmarking was handled in a fully automated and reproducible manner using the open-source Phoronix Test Suite software. Later on in this article are also performance-per-Watt results calculated via real-time monitoring with the Phoronix Test Suite.

The processor benchmarks being shown in this article are to provide a glimpse at the current look of Haswell on Linux. In terms of the likely performance issues found, those matters are actively being investigated so stay tuned for any future findings and more thorough Haswell Linux coverage once uncovering the problem(s).

<< Previous Page
1
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. CompuLab Intense-PC2: An Excellent, Fanless, Mini PC Powered By Intel's i7 Haswell
  2. From The Atom 330 To Haswell ULT: Intel Linux Performance Benchmarks
  3. AMD Radeon R9 285 Tonga Performance On Linux
  4. Apotop Wi-Copy
Latest Linux Articles
  1. AMD Moves Forward With Unified Linux Driver Strategy, New Kernel Driver
  2. MSI: Update Your BIOS From The Linux Desktop
  3. NVIDIA vs. AMD 2D Linux Drivers: Catalyst Is Getting Quite Good At 2D
  4. 15-Way GPU Comparison With Mesa 10.3 + Linux 3.17
Latest Linux News
  1. Linux 3.18-rc1 Released One Week Early With Many Changes
  2. The VC4 Gallium3D Driver Is Still Moving Along For The Raspberry Pi
  3. Direct3D 9 Support Might Land Within Mainline Mesa 3D Drivers
  4. OpenGL Preview Benchmarks For NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 970
  5. HOPE: The Ease Of Python With The Speed Of C++
  6. Vitesse: Using LLVM To Speed Up Databases
  7. AMD Is Restructuring Again, Losing 7% Of Employees
  8. Linux Testing Of The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970
  9. Qt 5.4 Now In Beta With Web, Bluetooth LE, Graphics Improvements
  10. AMD's Radeon R9 285 On Linux Offers Good OpenCL Performance
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. NVIDIA Presents Its Driver Plans To Support Mir/Wayland & KMS On Linux
  2. AMD Is Restructuring Again, Losing 7% Of Employees
  3. Bye bye BSD, Hello Linux: A Sys Admin's Story
  4. Open-Source AMD Fusion E-350 Support Takes A Dive
  5. Upgrade to Kaveri, very slow VDPAU performance
  6. ChromeOS Drops Support For EXT2/EXT3/EXT4 File-Systems
  7. Lennart Poettering On The Open-Source Community: A Sick Place To Be In
  8. The Slides Announcing The New "AMDGPU" Kernel Driver