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eVGA GeForce GTX 750 "Maxwell" On Ubuntu Linux

Michael Larabel

Published on 28 February 2014
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 9 - 8 Comments

After last week delivering the first NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti "Maxwell" Linux review, today at Phoronix we're looking at the GeForce GTX 750 (non-Ti) under Ubuntu Linux using an eVGA GTX 750 1GB model.

Aside from the launch-day review of the GeForce GTX 750 Ti, on Phoronix over the past week we also published more NVIDIA Maxwell Linux benchmarks and then a lengthy look at NVIDIA's mid-range Linux graphics performance going from the GeForce GTX 750 Ti to as far back as the GeForce 6600GT. In that long article, not only was the raw OpenGL performance looked at from the 6600GT to GTX 750 Ti but also the power efficiency, performance-per-Watt, and thermal data. Being curious how the GTX 750 graphics processor performs, I decided to pick up an eVGA GeForce GTX 750 graphics card for a look at Phoronix.

The eVGA GeForce GTX 750 retails for $119 USD -- the same as NVIDIA's MSRP -- as the slimmed down version of the GTX 750 Ti that retails for around $150 USD. Both GTX 750 models feature a "GM107" Maxwell GPU fabbed at 28nm but has only 512 shader processors (CUDA cores) versus 640 with the GTX 750 Ti, only 32 texture mapping units versus 40 on its bigger brother and 5.0 Gbps memory speed versus 5.4Gbps memory speed with the Ti version. The GPU core and memory frequencies are the same between the GTX 750 models while the non-Ti version has a TDP of 55 Watts versus 60 Watts with the GTX 750 Ti. This particular eVGA model also only has 1GB of GDDR5 video memory compared to the 2GB standard with the GTX 750 Ti (for a higher price, eVGA also sells a 2GB GTX 750).

The eVGA GeForce GTX 750 shipped with a Windows driver CD, case sticker, user guide, DVI to VGA adapter, and a poster. Due to the very low TDP of the GTX 750 Maxwell GPUs, no external power adapter is required.

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