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Cooler Master Cosmos S

Michael Larabel

Published on 28 February 2008
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 5 - 7 Comments

Back in August we looked at the Cooler Master Cosmos 1000, which was a very well designed EATX chassis that ultimately received our Editor's Choice Award for its excellent build quality, stylish design, and its feature-set. Just a few days ago, however, Cooler Master had unleashed the Cosmos S chassis. The Cosmos S RC-1100 is based upon the Cosmos design, but features a new racing theme, touch-sensitive panel, and various other improvements. The RC-1100 is meant to be the "Sports" version of the Cosmos 1000. In this review, we're looking at the Cooler Master Cosmos S as we load it up with an Intel 5400 EATX server motherboard and other high-end server hardware to see how this case really performs.

Features:

- Intelligent user interface with concealable I/O panel featuring a built-in touch sensor
- Cooler Master's flagship aluminum alloy gaming chassis
- Design inspired by the sleek contours of the hottest dream racecars
- Sports version of COSMOS 1000
- 13.8 kg Net Weight
- Supports ATX, Extended ATX motherboards
- 4 x Hidden 3.5" Drive Bays
- 7 x 5.25" Drive Bays
- 5 x 120mm Case Fans
- 1 x 200mm Side Fan

Contents:

Like the Cosmos 1000, when receiving the Cosmos S it had arrived in a very large cardboard box. Protecting the (expensive) chassis from damage during transport was Styrofoam on the top and the bottom ends. Not only was this case encased in a thick plastic bag, but also it was double-bagged with a reusable Cooler Master bag. The Cosmos S being double-bagged was a surprise to see, but it did its job ensuring the case arrived in pristine condition. The outer stands/handles to the case were also wrapped in a thin layer of foam. Inside of the case was a small cardboard box containing the mounting hardware, 8-pin motherboard power extension cable, 5.25" to 3.5" FDD mounting bracket, and cable management accessories.


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