1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Cooler Master Cosmos S

Michael Larabel

Published on 28 February 2008
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 5 - 7 Comments

Back in August we looked at the Cooler Master Cosmos 1000, which was a very well designed EATX chassis that ultimately received our Editor's Choice Award for its excellent build quality, stylish design, and its feature-set. Just a few days ago, however, Cooler Master had unleashed the Cosmos S chassis. The Cosmos S RC-1100 is based upon the Cosmos design, but features a new racing theme, touch-sensitive panel, and various other improvements. The RC-1100 is meant to be the "Sports" version of the Cosmos 1000. In this review, we're looking at the Cooler Master Cosmos S as we load it up with an Intel 5400 EATX server motherboard and other high-end server hardware to see how this case really performs.

Features:

- Intelligent user interface with concealable I/O panel featuring a built-in touch sensor
- Cooler Master's flagship aluminum alloy gaming chassis
- Design inspired by the sleek contours of the hottest dream racecars
- Sports version of COSMOS 1000
- 13.8 kg Net Weight
- Supports ATX, Extended ATX motherboards
- 4 x Hidden 3.5" Drive Bays
- 7 x 5.25" Drive Bays
- 5 x 120mm Case Fans
- 1 x 200mm Side Fan

Contents:

Like the Cosmos 1000, when receiving the Cosmos S it had arrived in a very large cardboard box. Protecting the (expensive) chassis from damage during transport was Styrofoam on the top and the bottom ends. Not only was this case encased in a thick plastic bag, but also it was double-bagged with a reusable Cooler Master bag. The Cosmos S being double-bagged was a surprise to see, but it did its job ensuring the case arrived in pristine condition. The outer stands/handles to the case were also wrapped in a thin layer of foam. Inside of the case was a small cardboard box containing the mounting hardware, 8-pin motherboard power extension cable, 5.25" to 3.5" FDD mounting bracket, and cable management accessories.


<< Previous Page
1
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. Even With Re-Clocking, Nouveau Remains Behind NVIDIA's Proprietary Linux Driver
  2. The Power Consumption & Efficiency Of Open-Source GPU Drivers
  3. AMD R600g/RadeonSI Performance On Linux 3.16 With Mesa 10.3-devel
  4. Intel Pentium G3258 On Linux
Latest Linux Articles
  1. AMD Catalyst 14.6 Does Slightly Better With APITest OpenGL Tests
  2. Updated Source Engine Benchmarks On The Latest AMD/NVIDIA Linux Drivers
  3. Nouveau vs. Radeon vs. Intel Tests On Linux 3.16, Mesa 10.3-devel
  4. KVM Benchmarks On Ubuntu 14.10
Latest Linux News
  1. Ubuntu 14.10 Alpha 2 Released
  2. KDE 4.14 Release Candidate Ships
  3. Drivers & Drama Dominated Linux Talk In July
  4. Fedora Assembles A Security Team
  5. AMD Launches The A10-7800, The 65 Watt Kaveri
  6. Builder: A New Development IDE Being Built For GNOME
  7. GDB 7.8 Betters Python Scripting, Adds Guile Support
  8. GNOME's GTK+ Is Still Striving For A Scene Graph, Canvas API
  9. Unreal Tournament Looks Great For Team Deathmatch
  10. LibreOffice 4.3 Released With Many Exciting Changes
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Linus Torvalds On GCC 4.9: Pure & Utter Crap
  2. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  3. Grand Theft Auto Running On Direct3D Natively On Linux Shows Gallium3D Potential
  4. Updated graphics drivers for Ubuntu 12.04 Precise LTS
  5. Debian + radeonsi
  6. AMD Publishes Open-Source Linux HSA Kernel Driver
  7. Open-source drivers on ATI R7 260X
  8. AMD Athlon 5350 APU On Linux