1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

ARCTIC Accelero Xtreme Plus II

Michael Larabel

Published on 24 November 2011
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 6 - 8 Comments

If you're a Linux desktop user on an open-source graphics driver that lacks proper fan management and power management support, you may want to consider an after-market graphics card cooler that is more efficient and also quieter. One of the high-performance after-market GPU cooling solutions is the ARCTIC Accelero Xtreme Plus II, which boasts three fans but is very quiet and does an incredible job at keeping NVIDIA and ATI/AMD graphics processors operating at quite low temperatures.

ARCTIC's goal with the Accelero Xtreme Plus II is "to satisfy overclockers with unmatched cooling performance while doing it in total silence." The ARCTIC Accelero Xtreme Plus II has three 92mm fans, which when combined with the aluminum heatsink and copper heatpipes, offer 300 Watts of cooling capacity. While there are three 92mm fans, they are controlled via Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) to spin only at the speeds necessary for sufficient cooling. The three fans are fluid dynamic bearing based and spin between 900 and 2000 RPM. The heatsink has 83 aluminum fins and there are five 6mm copper heatpipes.

The Accelero Xtreme Plus II is meant to be a near-universal cooler for both NVIDIA GeForce and ATI/AMD Radeon graphics cards. Due to being compatible with a range of graphics cards, there is not memory or VR power cooling integrated into the VGA heatsink itself. Shipping with the ARCTIC cooler are RAM and VR cooling heatsinks that can be applied with the included ARCTIC G-1 thermal glue. The weight on the heatsink itself is 615 grams.

Included with the ARCTIC Accelero Xtreme Plus II is the heatsink, mounting hardware (screws/washers/spacers), adhesive tape, thermal pads, G-1 thermal glue, a mixing wand for the G-1, a 4-pin molex fan power adapter, and a expansion slot bracket. ARCTIC backs this VGA cooler with a six-year limited warranty.

<< Previous Page
1
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. Preview: AMD's FX-9590 Eight-Core At Up To 5.0GHz On Linux
  2. Intel Launches The Core i7 5960X, Mighty Powerful Haswell-E CPUs
  3. AMD Radeon R9 290: Gallium3D vs. Catalyst Drivers
  4. AMD Radeon R9 290 Open-Source Driver Works, But Has A Ways To Go
Latest Linux Articles
  1. Ondemand vs. Performance CPU Governing For AMD FX CPUs On Linux 3.17
  2. How Intel Graphics On Linux Compare To Open-Source AMD/NVIDIA Drivers
  3. The Fastest NVIDIA GPUs For Open-Source Nouveau With Steam Linux Gaming
  4. Testing For The Latest Linux Kernel Power Regression
Latest Linux News
  1. Marek Lands Radeon Gallium3D HyperZ Improvements
  2. Mozilla Firefox 32 Surfaces With HTML5, Developer Changes
  3. Nouveau X.Org Driver Released With DRI3+Present, Maxwell, GLAMOR
  4. Microsoft & AMD Release C++ AMP Compiler With Linux Support
  5. AMD, Wine & Valve Dominated August For Linux Users
  6. Linux 3.17-rc3 Kernel Released Back On Schedule
  7. Lennart Poettering Talks Up His New Linux Vision That Involves Btrfs
  8. Mesa 10.3 RC2 Arrives Via Its New Release Manager
  9. Ubuntu 14.10's Lack Of X.Org Server 1.16 Gets Blamed On AMD
  10. MSI Motherboard BIOS Updating Remains A Pain For Linux Users
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Lennart Poettering Talks Up His New Linux Vision That Involves Btrfs
  2. Best Radeon for a Power Mac G5?
  3. The dangers of Linux kernel development
  4. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  5. AMD Releases UVD Video Decode Support For R600 GPUs
  6. SSD seems slow
  7. Is laptop with Intel CPU and AMD dGPU worth buying considering especially AMD Enduro?
  8. Radeon HD5670 and Ubuntu 14.04