1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

The Major Open-Source ATI Improvements Over Two Years

Michael Larabel

Published on 11 April 2011
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 5 of 5 - 53 Comments

Warsow was broken on this Lenovo ThinkPad up until Ubuntu 10.04.2 on the open-source driver. The performance then was still shoddy due to classic Mesa, but with Ubuntu 10.10+ on Gallium3D, the performance is much better. However, the performance has regressed since Mesa 7.9 and even still with the latest Mesa 7.11-devel code there is a noticeable regression. However, what is interesting is that for this test it's performance is ahead of Catalyst -- this time by 67%.

With Warsow at 1400 x 1050, the latest ATI code is still faster than Catalyst and there does not seem to be a Mesa 7.10/7.11 regression at this resolution like there was at 800 x 600.

The results from testing each Ubuntu release to look at the open-source ATI experience are not surprising. The open-source ATI Linux support is a hell of a lot better than it was two years ago. There's now mature DRI2 and kernel mode-setting support, the Gallium3D drivers (both R300g and R600g) are now superior to the classic Mesa drivers, and many new features continue to be implemented that allow for better performance or in other cases for OpenGL applications/games to properly work. With the landing of KMS page-flipping and other recent work, the "out of the box" ATI experience in Ubuntu 11.04 should be quite pleasing and noticeably better than previous releases.

More results are on OpenBenchmarking.org.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Linux Compiler Benchmarks Of LLVM Clang 3.5 vs. LLVM Clang 3.6-rc1
  2. Intel Broadwell HD Graphics 5500: Windows 8.1 vs. Linux
  3. Linux Benchmarks Of NVIDIA's Early 2015 GeForce Line-Up
  4. NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960: A Great $200 GPU For Linux Gamers
  5. Disk Encryption Tests On Fedora 21
  6. Xonotic 0.8 Performance With The Open-Source AMD/NVIDIA Gallium3D Drivers
Latest Linux News
  1. Ubuntu's Mir Gains Server-Side Platform Probing
  2. Broadwell Linux Ultrabook Running MUCH Cooler Than Haswell
  3. LZHAM 1.0 Lossless Data Compression Codec Released
  4. LibreOffice 4.4 Is Coming Soon With New Features
  5. Linux Users Upset By Chromium's Busted HiDPI Support
  6. BPF Backend Merged Into LLVM To Make Use Of New Kernel Functionality
  7. Dying Light Is Headed To Linux, SteamOS
  8. Wayland 1.6.1 & Weston 1.6.1 Released
  9. Mesa 10.4.3 Brings A Bunch Of Fixes For The Direct3D "Nine" Support
  10. Intel Has A Few More Graphics Changes For The Linux 3.20 Kernel
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. Windows 10 To Be A Free Upgrade: What Linux Users Need To Know
  2. Google Admin Encourages Trying Btrfs, Not ZFS On Linux
  3. TraceFS: The Newest Linux File-System
  4. My Initial Intel Broadwell Linux Experience With The ThinkPad X1 Carbon
  5. Mozilla's Servo Still On Track For 2015 Alpha Release
  6. Fedora 23 Likely To Pursue Wayland By Default
  7. Keith Packard Leaves Intel's Linux Graphics Work
  8. A Proposal To Go 64-bit Only With Fedora 23