More AMD Radeon 5770 Linux Benchmarks
Written by Michael Larabel in Graphics Cards on 16 October 2009. Page 2 of 2. 8 Comments

The results from Unigine Tropics were also interesting with this mass AA/AF resolution testing. The Radeon HD 4870 again started out on top with the lowest tested resolution but was on the bottom with the highest tested resolution. At 1400 x 1050 and above, the Radeon HD 4870 performed slower than the Radeon HD 5770 while at 2560 x 1600 it also fell behind the Radeon HD 5750 graphics card. With frame-rates below 20 FPS, none of these graphics cards are playable at 2560 x 1600 with these settings. In fact, with 12x edge-detect AA and 4x AF, one would want to run these graphics cards with a relatively low resolution for a playable experience under this very advanced OpenGL game engine that's well-supported on Linux.

The Radeon HD 4870 started out in Lightsmark 2008 running 14 FPS higher than the Radeon HD 5770 graphics card, but at 2560 x 1600 it only had a 4 FPS advantage. The positions in all of these tests though were the same at each resolution. The Radeon HD 4870 was the fastest with the Radeon HD 5770 just behind that followed by the Radeon HD 5750 being a ways behind.

Those are our initial anti-aliasing / anisotropic filtering numbers for the ATI Radeon HD 5700 series graphics cards under Ubuntu Linux. The Unigine Tropics and Enemy Territory: Quake Wars results show stronger performance for the Juniper graphics processors over the RV770, but with VDrift and Lightsmark the Radeon HD 4870 was more competitive. Besides in Unigine Tropics where all of the graphics cards drop to their knees with AA/AF and a high resolution, the other tests could handle the Juniper GPUs at 2560 x 1600 better. More ATI Radeon HD 5700 tests are on the way.

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Michael Larabel is the principal author of and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via

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