1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

VisionTek Radeon HD 4870 X2 2GB

Michael Larabel

Published on 22 August 2008
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 9 of 9 - 4 Comments

Conclusion:

In a majority of the benchmarks -- including those with anti-aliasing and anisotropic filtering -- the ATI Radeon HD 4870 X2 was within frames of the dual Radeon HD 4870 CrossFire configuration. However, in some tests such as running Enemy Territory: Quake Wars at 2560 x 1600, the R700 had fallen about eight frames behind, or about 6%. The Radeon HD 4870 X2 isn't quite as far as two Radeon HD 4870 512MB graphics cards linked together via CrossFire, but it's darn close.

Using the Catalyst 8.8 Linux driver, we had experienced no fundamental problems with this dual GPU graphics card on Ubuntu Linux. The dual monitor support and OverDrive 5 also work with this graphics card on Linux. Through the aticonfig-based options for overclocking, we were able to increase the memory frequency to 960MHz and the graphics processor while the GPUs could only be pushed about 15MHz further, but this effort resulted in a few more frames per second in some tests. Below are the thermal results for this GPU as it was running through Enemy Territory: Quake War at 2560 x 1600 with 8x AA and 16x AF.

Running around 70°C, the Radeon HD 4870 X2 is a bit toasty, but still within its operational range.

The VisionTek Radeon HD 4870 X2 2GB graphics card is currently retailing for about $560 USD, which is about $120 more than NVIDIA's current flagship single-GPU GeForce GTX 280 and about $20 less than buying two Radeon HD 4870 graphics cards individually.

If you are after CrossFire on Linux, the Radeon HD 4870 X2 is a good candidate considering its lower price point than buying two Radeon HD 4870 graphics cards individually, but two Radeon HD 4870 X2 graphics cards cannot be combined on Linux for running in a four-GPU CrossFireX configuration. When it comes to open-source support, the Radeon HD 4870 X2 is supported by both the xf86-video-ati and xf86-video-radeonhd drivers when it comes to mode-setting, but there is currently no open-source 3D acceleration for the R600/700 series quite yet (though Coming Soon: AMD R600 3D Documentation). When there is the support though, it will be limited to one GPU. We wouldn't expect to see CrossFire before 2010, so if you intend to be using any open-source ATI driver at least partially, you will be better off using a graphics card with a single GPU.

Right now the CrossFire Linux support is limited to three titles (Doom 3, Quake 4, and Enemy Territory: Quake Wars) and the setup/configuration process of this multi-GPU support isn't trivial for the new Linux user, but we expect the configuration process to improve with time through the AMD Catalyst Control Center as well as more OpenGL titles being supported by this multi-GPU technology. If you're a dedicated gamer that enjoys playing any of the id Software titles at very high resolutions and with all of the image quality settings maxed out, the Radeon HD 4870 X2 is a graphics card worth considering.

For pricing and other reviews on ATI graphics cards, visit TestFreaks.com.

9
Next Page >>
About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. AMD Radeon R9 290: Gallium3D vs. Catalyst Drivers
  2. AMD Radeon R9 290 Open-Source Driver Works, But Has A Ways To Go
  3. Trying The Configurable 45 Watt TDP With AMD's A10-7800 / A6-7400K
  4. Sumo's Omni Gets Reloaded
Latest Linux Articles
  1. 20-Way Radeon Comparison With Open-Source Graphics For Steam On Linux Gaming
  2. Preview: OS X 10.10 Yosemite vs. Ubuntu Linux GPU Performance
  3. Radeon Graphics Yield Mixed Results With Linux 3.17 Kernel
  4. AMD's RadeonSI Driver Sped Up A Lot This Summer
Latest Linux News
  1. PHP 5.6 Officially Released With New Debugger
  2. Re-Clocking Your NVIDIA GPU With Nouveau On Linux 3.17
  3. Radeon DRM Queues More Changes, RV6xx UVD For Linux 3.18
  4. Nouveau On Oibaf PPA Is Back To Running Well
  5. Metro 2033 Redux Will Hopefully Hit Linux Real Soon
  6. New Virtual Monitor Software Might End Up On Linux
  7. Company of Heroes 2 Might Be Coming Out For Linux
  8. NIR Still Being Discussed For Mesa, LLVM Gets Brought Up Again
  9. Plasma Active Is Mostly Ported To KDE Frameworks 5
  10. Google Chrome 37 Brings Many Security Fixes
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Canonical Joined The Khronos Group To Help Mir/Wayland Drivers
  2. AMD Releases UVD Video Decode Support For R600 GPUs
  3. Best Radeon for a Power Mac G5?
  4. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  5. Announcing radeontop, a tool for viewing the GPU usage
  6. It's Now Possible To Play Netflix Natively On Linux Without Wine Plug-Ins
  7. [DB] BIOS - ACPI - data collecting
  8. Users defect to Linux as OpenBSD removes Lynx from base system