1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Sapphire Radeon HD 4670 512MB

Michael Larabel

Published on 23 September 2008
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 9 - 17 Comments

Examination:

The reference ATI Radeon HD 4670 graphics card is much smaller than the Radeon HD 4800 series when it comes to the PCB size and isn't much different from the earlier ATI Radeon HD 3600 series. The cooling solution on the Sapphire version occupies a single slot and contains a single fan approximately 70mm in size. This fan though is only powered by a two-wire cable compared to four wires on the reference model and other newer graphics cards. A sticker showcasing Sapphire Technology's fictional graphics girl, the company's logo and URL, and then the model of this graphics card covers the front of this graphics card.

The RV730XT core used by the Radeon HD 4670 is built on a 55nm fabrication process, its reference clock is 750MHz, contains 320 unified shader pipelines, its peak memory bandwidth is 32 GB/s, and supports Unified Video Decoder 2. There is no heatsink covering any of the memory ICs on either side of the graphics card. The memory used by the Sapphire HD 4670 is made by Hynix with a part number of H5RS5223CFR, which is rated to operate at 1000MHz. The Radeon HD 4670 uses GDDR3 memory (a step-down from the GDDR5 used by the Radeon HD 4870) with a 128-bit interface.

The Radeon HD 4600 series is CrossFireX compatible, which means you can connect up to four ATI GPUs together to split the rendering workload. ATI CrossFire support came to Linux just last month, however, with the current implementation the Linux driver supports sharing the graphics workload just between two GPUs. No CrossFire testing is being done in this article though due to only having one Sapphire Radeon HD 4670.

Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance
  2. CompuLab Intense-PC2: An Excellent, Fanless, Mini PC Powered By Intel's i7 Haswell
  3. From The Atom 330 To Haswell ULT: Intel Linux Performance Benchmarks
  4. AMD Radeon R9 285 Tonga Performance On Linux
Latest Linux Articles
  1. 6-Way Ubuntu 14.10 Linux Desktop Benchmarks
  2. Ubuntu 14.10 XMir System Compositor Benchmarks
  3. Btrfs RAID HDD Testing On Ubuntu Linux 14.10
  4. Ubuntu 14.10 Linux 32-bit vs. 64-bit Performance
Latest Linux News
  1. Mesa 10.4 Might Re-Enable HyperZ For R600g/RadeonSI
  2. Intel GVT-g GPU Virtualization Moves Closer
  3. GTK+ 3.16 To Bring Several New Features
  4. Debian 8.0 Jessie Has Many Multimedia Improvements
  5. What Linux Benchmarks Would You Like To See Next?
  6. Open-Source, Linux Support For Corsair Link Devices Slowly Materializing
  7. Cairo-Dock 3.4 Shows A Lot Of Progress, Works Toward EGL/Wayland Support
  8. Mesa 10.4 Tentatively Planned For Early December
  9. SteamOS Update 145 Brings Compositor, Update Fixes
  10. GStreamer 2014 Conference Videos Posted: Wayland, HTML5, 3D
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. HOPE: The Ease Of Python With The Speed Of C++
  2. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  3. Linux hacker compares Solaris kernel code:
  4. Users/Developers Threatening Fork Of Debian GNU/Linux
  5. Ubuntu 16.04 Might Be The Distribution's Last 32-Bit Release
  6. AMD Releases UVD Video Decode Support For R600 GPUs
  7. Proof that strlcpy is un-needed
  8. xbox one tv tuner