1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

AMD FX-8350 "Vishera" Linux Benchmarks

Michael Larabel

Published on 23 October 2012
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 10 of 10 - 116 Comments

From the initial testing of the brand new AMD FX-8350 "Vishera", the performance was admirable, especially compared to last year's bit of a troubled start with the AMD FX Bulldozer processors.

For many of the Linux computational benchmarks carried out in this article, the AMD FX-8350 proved to be competitive with the Intel Core i7 3770K "Ivy Bridge" processor. Seeing the FX-8350 compete with the i7-3770K at stock speeds in so many benchmarks was rather a surprise since the Windows-focused AMD marketing crew was more expecting this new high-end processor to be head-to-head competition for the Intel Core i7 3570K on Microsoft's operating system.

The slated retail price at launch for the FX-8350 is $195 USD. The Intel Core i5 3570K is presently retailing for around $230 and the Intel Core i7 3770K is around $330. In other words, the AMD FX-8350 is offered at a rather competitive value for fairly high-end desktops and workstations against Intel's latest Ivy Bridge offerings -- if you're commonly engaging in a workload where AMD CPUs do well.

In not all of the Linux CPU benchmarks did the Piledriver-based FX-8350 do well. For some Linux programs, AMD CPUs simply don't perform well and the 2012 FX CPU was even beaten out by older Core i5 and i7 CPUs. We can hopefully see improvements here later on through compiler optimizations and other software enhancements. As shown in my earlier AMD Piledriver compiler tuning tests from the A10-5800K Trinity, with the current GCC release there isn't much improvement out of the "bdver2" optimizations for this processor that should expose the CPU's BMI, TBM, F16C, and FMA3 capabilities over the original AMD Bulldozer processors. I hope that we will see further compiler improvements out of AMD to close some of these performance gaps.

Due to the open nature of Linux with a wide variety of options being available for testing the kernel, different compilers and compiler flags, plus countless other settings and packages that can be tweaked, many more AMD FX-8350 benchmarks are on the way. An article following up closely after this initial launch-day AMD Vishera article will also go over the performance-per-Watt, the Linux gaming benchmark performance, and other interesting data.

From my initial testing of the AMD FX-8350 over the past two weeks (though the last couple of days over in Prague for LinuxDays), I'm quite satisfied with the AMD FX-8350 eight-core processor on Linux. Aside from the FX-8350 performing well in most CPU benchmarks, the FX-8350 also works well under Linux. The only Linux compatibility complaint I have about the Piledriver CPUs on Linux is that the CPU temperature monitoring didn't work from Ubuntu 12.10, but that isn't normally a show-stopping problem. It would also be nice for AMD to port more user-space utilities to Linux for overclocking and other CPU information reporting, but there isn't any CPU vendor currently doing that for Linux so it's basically a feature request.

Stay tuned for more Vishera Linux testing and thanks to AMD for providing this early FX-8350 sample for being able to provide launch-day Linux coverage for their many open-source customers.

10
Next Page >>
About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. Intel Launches The Core i7 5960X, Mighty Powerful Haswell-E CPUs
  2. AMD Radeon R9 290: Gallium3D vs. Catalyst Drivers
  3. AMD Radeon R9 290 Open-Source Driver Works, But Has A Ways To Go
  4. Trying The Configurable 45 Watt TDP With AMD's A10-7800 / A6-7400K
Latest Linux Articles
  1. Testing For The Latest Linux Kernel Power Regression
  2. The Most Energy Efficient Radeon GPU For AMD Linux Gaming
  3. 20-Way Radeon Comparison With Open-Source Graphics For Steam On Linux Gaming
  4. Preview: OS X 10.10 Yosemite vs. Ubuntu Linux GPU Performance
Latest Linux News
  1. LibreOffice Ported To 64-bit ARM (AArch64)
  2. Enlightenment E19 RC3 Shows Off The New Wayland Compositor
  3. Metro Redux Is Going To Require OpenGL 4.x On Linux
  4. Jailhouse v0.1 Released As A Basic Hypervisor For Linux
  5. Google's Chromebook "Samus" Now Supported By Coreboot
  6. Chrome 38 Now In Beta With Exciting Advancements
  7. Ubuntu's Utopic Unicorn 14.10 Beta 1 Released
  8. Genode OS 14.08 Has New GUI Architecture, Pluggable VFS
  9. Another Intel Linux Power Regression Is Being Investigated
  10. DNF Makes It A Step Closer To Replacing Yum On Fedora
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  2. Canonical Joined The Khronos Group To Help Mir/Wayland Drivers
  3. Users defect to Linux as OpenBSD removes Lynx from base system
  4. Radeon HD5670 and Ubuntu 14.04
  5. AMD Releases UVD Video Decode Support For R600 GPUs
  6. Best Radeon for a Power Mac G5?
  7. OC capability - Intel Core i5 4690K & Biostar Hi-Fi Z97WE
  8. Announcing radeontop, a tool for viewing the GPU usage