1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Amazon EC2 Cloud Benchmarks Against Bare Metal Systems

Michael Larabel

Published on 30 September 2013
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - 1 Comment

After earlier this month delivering new Amazon EC2 cloud benchmarks, several Phoronix readers had requested some reference benchmark results against some "bare metal" hardware systems. For those not running their own performance comparisons against Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud, here's some more benchmark results showing different EC2 cloud instance types compared to an Intel Ivy Bridge and Haswell system.

Today's data extends the Amazon EC2 performance benchmarks from earlier this month with results from an Intel Core i3 3217U "Ivy Bridge" and Intel Core i7 4750HQ "Haswell" systems. These are just two reference systems to give a better idea for how Amazon's m1.small, m1.medium, m1.large, m1.xlarge, and m3.xlarge EC2 instances compare to this modern Intel hardware with the benchmarks running on the systems themselves without any form of virtualization/container. These bare metal results were coming from an Ubuntu 13.10-based system, while the EC2 cloud was running Amazon's AMI, so besides the obvious differences, take the system

M1 Small - m1.small - 1 ECU / 1 Core / 1.7GB RAM / $0.060 per Hour

M1 Medium - m1.medium - 2 ECU / 1 Core / 3.7GB RAM / $0.120 per Hour

M1 Large - m1.large - 4 ECU / 2 Cores / 7.5GB RAM / $0.240 per Hour

M1 Extra Large - m1.xlarge - 8 ECUs / 4 Cores / 15GB RAM / $0.480 per Hour

M3 Extra Large - m3.xlarge - 13 ECUs / 4 Cores / 15GB RAM / $0.500 per Hour

These results are just some quick data points to give a better idea for rough expectations of the different Amazon cloud instances. Via the open-source Phoronix Test Suite software, you can easily repeat these benchmarks in a very easy, fully automated, and reproducible manner.

With the Phoronix Test Suite installed on any Linux/BSD/Solaris/OSX system, it's simply a matter of running phoronix-test-suite benchmark 1309198-SO-AMAZONCLO37 from the command-line to download all of the captured test data, download and install the selected tests and their configuration files, and then it proceeds to run the benchmarks and compare the results side-by-side via integration with OpenBenchmarking.org. There's also commercial support available and other custom engineering services for the dozens of enterprise-class features that our open-source benchmarking software has queued up over the half-decade of its public existence and nine years of internal development.

Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. NVIDIA's $1000+ GeForce GTX TITAN X Delivers Maximum Linux Performance
  2. OS X 10.10 vs. Ubuntu 15.04 vs. Fedora 21 Tests: Linux Sweeps The Board
  3. The New Place Where Linux Code Is Constantly Being Benchmarked
  4. 18-GPU NVIDIA/AMD Linux Comparison Of BioShock: Infinite
  5. Phoronix Test Suite 5.6 Adds New Phoromatic Enterprise Benchmarking Features
  6. OpenGL Threaded Optimizations Responsible For NVIDIA's Faster Performance?
Latest Linux News
  1. Improved OpenCL Support For Blender's Cycles Renderer
  2. Mesa 10.5.2 Packs In A Handful Of Fixes
  3. More Fedora/Ubuntu Linux vs. OS X OpenGL Benchmarks
  4. Intel Adds Mesa IR To NIR Translator & Makes Other NIR Improvements
  5. HAMMER2 Gets A Man Page
  6. Kodi 14.2 Released To End Out The "XBMC" 14.x Series
  7. Debian 8.0 Jessie RC2 Installer Released
  8. Shadow Warrior Is Being Released For Linux Next Week
  9. Intel Pushes A Bunch Of Broadwell Code Into Coreboot
  10. Open-Source Driver Fans Will Love NVIDIA's New OpenGL Demo
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. Introducing The Library Operating System For Linux
  2. AMD Is Hiring Two More Open-Source Linux GPU Driver Developers
  3. Allwinner Continues Jerking Around The Open-Source Community
  4. New SecureBoot Concerns Arise With Windows 10
  5. Systemd Change Allows For Stateless Systems With Tmpfs
  6. GNOME Shell & Mutter 3.16.0 Released
  7. GNU Nano 2.4.0 Brings Complete Undo System, Linter Support & More
  8. Red Hat Is Rolling Out A VirtIO DRM/KMS GPU Driver
%%CLICK_URL_UNESC%%