1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Virtualization Made Easy In Ubuntu 8.04

Michael Larabel

Published on 30 January 2008
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 4 - 1 Comment

With Ubuntu 8.04 the virt-manager and libvirt packages aren't on the CD, but only a step away in the repository. To get started, just run sudo apt-get install virt-manager libvirt-bin kvm. The libvirt daemon will automatically start and from there you can launch virt-manager and connect to localhost (or a remote machine running libvirtd, if applicable to your needs).

Once connecting to the virtualization backend, a graphical interface will guide you through the entire guest OS installation process. One of the first steps in the installation process is to select para-virtualization or full virtualization and selecting the guest CPU architecture. The CPU architectures currently supported are i686, x86_64, PowerPC, SPARC, MIPS, and MIPSEL. If the kvm-intel or kvm-amd kernel modules are loaded (for providing the KVM functionality), check the box for enabling kernel/hardware acceleration.

After selecting the guest architecture is a screen for locating the installation media and specifying the guest operating system type. Virt-manager supports loading an ISO image, CD-ROM or DVD, and a network PXE boot for loading the installation image. Selecting the operating system type is used for loading OS profiles, which will adjust the boot arguments according (such as whether to use ACPI). The operating system types listed are Generic, Linux, Other, UNIX, and Windows. The Linux variants currently include Debian Etch, Debian Lenny, Fedora Core 5, Fedora Core 6, Fedora 7, Fedora 8, Generic 2.4.x kernel, Generic 2.6.x kernel, RHEL 2.1, RHEL 3, RHEL 4, RHEL 5, SuSE Linux Enterprise Server, and Ubuntu Hardy. For the other type are Generic, MS-DOS, Novell Netware 4, Novell Netware 5, and Novell Netware 6. UNIX variants include FreeBSD 6.x, OpenBSD 4.x, Sun Solaris 9, and Sun Solaris 10. If you are still using Redmond software, the supported versions of Windows include Microsoft Windows Vista, Windows 2000, Windows 2003, and Windows XP.

Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Intel Broadwell: GCC 4.9 vs. LLVM Clang 3.5 Compiler Benchmarks
  2. Ubuntu vs. Fedora Linux On Lenovo's X1 Carbon With Core i7 Broadwell
  3. Ubuntu 15.04 Is The Easy Path To Better Performance On Intel Broadwell
  4. NVIDIA's Latest Maxwell Line-Up Against AMD With Catalyst On Linux
  5. Preliminary Tests Of Intel Sandy Bridge & Ivy Bridge vs. Broadwell
  6. AMD FX-8320E Performance On Linux
Latest Linux News
  1. Calamares 1.0 Distribution-Independent Installer Framework Released
  2. Librem 15 Linux Laptop Set To Close At Around $400k USD
  3. Virtual GEM To Increase Mesa's Software Rasterizer Performance
  4. Open Lunchbox: Yet Another Open-Source Laptop Attempt
  5. Wayland/Weston 1.7 Release Candidate
  6. Bugzilla 5.0 Is Coming Soon With New Features
  7. Linux Benchmarking... Even Faster & A Very Interesting February
  8. Does VirtualBox VM Have Much A Future Left?
  9. HAMMER2 File-System Is Still Slowly Coming Together
  10. The Better Looking Window Decorations For GNOME 3.16
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. PlayStation 4 System Compiler Support Landing In LLVM
  2. Linux "GHOST" Vulnerability Hits Glibc Systems
  3. LibreOffice 4.4 Is Coming Soon With New Features
  4. Broadwell Linux Ultrabook Running MUCH Cooler Than Haswell
  5. LZHAM 1.0 Lossless Data Compression Codec Released
  6. LLVM Adds Options To Do Fuzz Testing
  7. Vivaldi: A New Chromium-Powered, Multi-Platform Browser
  8. Linux Users Upset By Chromium's Busted HiDPI Support