1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Virtualization Made Easy In Ubuntu 8.04

Michael Larabel

Published on 30 January 2008
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 4 - 1 Comment

One of the features that was introduced a year ago into Ubuntu 7.04 "Feisty Fawn" was support for KVM, which is the Kernel-based Virtual Machine. The Kernel-based Virtual Machine provides full virtualization support for Linux when running on x86 hardware with either Intel's VT or AMD-V technology, which means you can run unmodified guest operating systems such as Linux or Microsoft Windows within your Linux host operating system. As we had shared in benchmarks, KVM -- even back to its infancy -- has been quite fast at virtualization when compared to Xen or kqemu. However, the KVM virtualization support found in Ubuntu hasn't been the most user-friendly. Installing and then managing these guest operating systems in Ubuntu 7.04 and Ubuntu 7.10 has required using the command-line interface and thus requiring the user to be familiar with the various QEMU options. However, in Ubuntu 8.04 this has all changed for the better now that virt-manager and libvirt are available from the main Ubuntu repository.

KVM support had premiered in Fedora 7 "Moonshine" around the same time as Ubuntu 7.04, but this virtualization support was accompanied by two new Red Hat innovations: virt-manager and libvirt. Virt-manager is the Virtual Machine Manager and is a GUI for managing virtual machines while at its foundation is libvirt, which is a virtualization API for not only interfacing with KVM but also Xen, QEMU, and OpenVZ. Virt-manager goes beyond just providing a user interface for facilitating the installation and basic management of the guest operating systems, but also provides a detailed analysis of the guest performance/resource usage and modifying the virtual system details (CPU cores, disk size, network devices, and memory capacity). In addition, there are cloning and imaging tools for enhanced virtualization management. Furthermore, virt-manager can connect to a remove virtual server backend using SSH or TLS/SSL. While libvirt is written in C, virt-manager is written in Python with Glade and GTK+. When virt-manager was released, we had provided a virtualization tour and how-to guide on Fedora 7.

While Ubuntu 8.04 final will not be available until April, virt-manager and libvirt are already in the Hardy Heron repository and is one of the features for the Ubuntu 8.04 Alpha 4 release, which is due out tomorrow. This is not the first time emerging Red Hat technologies are appearing in Ubuntu, but in Ubuntu 7.10 was system-config-printer and the Fedora-spawned IcedTea project for Java support via Sun's OpenJDK.

<< Previous Page
1
Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. Btrfs On 4 x Intel SSDs In RAID 0/1/5/6/10
  2. AMD Radeon R9 290 On Ubuntu 14.10: RadeonSI Gallium3D vs. Catalyst
  3. MSI X99S SLI PLUS On Linux
  4. NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance
Latest Linux Articles
  1. Windows 8.1 vs. Ubuntu 14.10 With Intel HD Graphics
  2. 6-Way Ubuntu 14.10 Radeon Gallium3D vs. Catalyst Driver Comparison
  3. NVIDIA vs. Nouveau Drivers On Ubuntu 14.10
  4. Ubuntu 14.10 Offers AMD Radeon Driver Performance Improvements
Latest Linux News
  1. Has The Sky Fallen? Qualcomm Contributes To Freedreno's DRM/KMS Driver
  2. Manjaro Works To Make Calamares A Distribution-Independent Installer
  3. DisplayLink USB 3.0 Support Sounds Like A Mess
  4. PulseAudio Gains A Native Bluetooth Headset Backend
  5. X.Org Foundation Decides On Its Women Outreach Project
  6. GTK+ 3.16's New GtkGLArea Widget Gets Improved
  7. X.Org Server 1.17 ABI Bumped
  8. Fedora 21 Beta To Be Released Next Week
  9. Go 1.4 Beta Release Brings Big Runtime Changes
  10. SIMD For JavaScript Continues Coming Along
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Closed source to opensource
  2. How to get rid of Linux
  3. Is foolish currently develop in machine code, hexadecimal and assembly?
  4. Reducing The CPU Usage In Mesa To Improve Performance
  5. Help diagnosing problems with a Readon HD 4670 on Mesa 10.3.2-1
  6. Advertisements On Phoronix
  7. nv and xorg.conf under Debian PPC
  8. Looking for a Open-Source AMD experienced Linux mentor