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Corsair Flash PadLock 2GB

Michael Larabel

Published on 2 September 2007
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 4 - 1 Comment

Corsair is known for their high-performance system memory and for the past two years or so, we have seen very innovative flash products from this memory leader. The Corsair Flash Voyager marked the era of waterproof flash drives only to be succeeded by the Flash Voyager GT. Both of these USB flash drive series not only performed great and handled all of our durability tests, but it was also backed by a ten-year warranty and official support for Linux. Earlier this year, however, Corsair redefined durable flash drives by unleashing the Flash Survivor GT. In our premiere review of the Corsair Flash Survivor GT 8GB, the flash drive was not only fast but had withstood our harsh torture treatment, which consisted of letting the Flash Survivor GT rest at the bottom of an 8 foot deep pool, smashing it with a hammer, and even boiled it in a pot of water. At the end of the day, the Corsair Flash Survivor GT continued to operate like it was brand new with its leading performance edge. Today at Phoronix we are testing out Corsair's latest flash memory product, which claims to offer affordable security for your data via a hardware-based lock. This product at hand is the Corsair Flash PadLock and in this review we go as far as taking apart the entire flash drive to look at its locking mechanism.

Features:

· Auto-Locking - Self locking after removal from computer
· Customizable PIN - Set your own PIN and make it easy to remember
· Easy to Use - Direct keypad access and indicator lights make locking/unlocking simple
· Plug and Play - Hardware based security works without installing or running software
· Platform independent - Works on Windows, MAC and Linux platforms without the use of software

Contents:

Like Corsair's other flash and system memory products, the Flash PadLock was in a plastic clamshell container. Included were a lanyard, USB extension cable, user guide, and the flash drive itself. The Corsair Flash PadLock is available in a 1GB (CMFUSBPADLOCK-1GB) and 2GB capacity (CMFUSBPADLOCK-2GB). The model we have our hands on for this review is the 2GB Flash PadLock.

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